The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Doing it the write way

Our headline writer is still on strike

Sex, drug use, vomiting and random acts of violence. This list sounds more like the makings of a dysfunctional night on the town than a formula for success. But since November 5, 2007, when The Writers Guild of America went on strike, the latter has seemed more accurate.

As writers took up picket lines and reality TV like “Rock of Love 2 with Bret Michaels” feasted furiously on minds everywhere, for a while it seemed the art of writing things deeper than fart jokes and scripted reality had disappeared.

But that all changed recently with writers and Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers reaching an agreement ending the 100-day strike. Both groups finally came to a concurrence over issues such as increased residuals for writers from DVD sales and future airings of creative material. Writers claimed these residuals were essential to them because of their dependency on this money during periodic unemployment.

The AMPTP estimates that WGA writers and crewmembers have lost $342.8 million in wages.

But now with the strike over and some of America’s best minds finally back at work, we can breathe a sigh of relief. Sure, America’s top networks are still ordering “unscripted” reality programs now more than ever. Yes, we can expect to receive infinite more renditions of movies like “Norbit” and TV programs like “The Real Orange County: Newport Beach,” but focusing on that misses the point. Just as writers had to remind themselves during the strike, it’s the principle that matters.

This strike had a twin-pronged affect on the entertainment industry: It reminded studios of the importance of writers, and allowed this ironically muted group to their employer’s apparent apathy. The strike also gave TV programs with smaller followings, such as Showtime’s “Dexter,” chances at wider exposure. Major networks bought the rights to previously aired seasons, some even green-lighting pilots for YouTube stars, while racing to fill their spring lineups during the strike.

This strike showed us that just like the current state of the record industry, dire changes needed to be made if quality, or at least consistency is to be maintained.

Welcome back writers! While the Oscars may have garnered its lowest ratings ever, we know you guys are back in full force. How else could Jon Stewart have pulled off all those zingers? The secret: Bruce Vilanch. But, seriously, get back to work fast. American entertainment needs some saving from itself and you are our only hope.

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