The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU students gather around a bucket of markers to write an encouraging note to put in “Welcome to the Shelter” kits at event in mid-April on SMU’s campus.
Dallas homeless recovery center, The Bridge, is a home
Morgan Shiver, Contributor • June 20, 2024
Instagram

Can Congress get anything right?

Partisan politics goes to the Majors

If watching the Roger Clemens and Brian McNamee fiasco proved anything, it is that Congress clearly cannot accomplish anything. Rather than provide clarity to this complicated he said-he said argument, Congress complicated the issue by leaving most people more confused about what actually happened.

The entire Congressional hearing was characterized by questions that, for the most part, clarified only minor points of the problem and partisan politics. The Republicans spent the entire time questioning the credibility of McNamee, while the Democrats questioned Clemens’ improbable story.

With all of the questions and answers that came forth in the hearing, both McNamee and Clemens seemed like they were lying. Neither one of the stories emerged as the probable truth.

While Clemens seemed genuine, his story fails the test of logic. What incentive does Andy Pettite have to lie about Clemens’ steroid use? Why would McNamee risk perjuring himself and only lie about Clemens (not Pettitte or Chuck Knoblauch)?

Conversely, parts of McNamee’s story have been corroborated and he has little incentive to lie. However, his credibility looked extremely suspect considering the vast amount of lies he has told in the past. Furthermore, he withheld evidence from federal prosecutors until Clemens personally angered him by taping a phone call.

So who should the public believe in this situation? The answer is that no matter whose side the American public chooses, the real issue with steroids has absolutely nothing to do with McNamee, Clemens, records or anything else.

The real issue is steroid use among high school and collegiate athletes who look to superstars like Clemens as heroes. In the opening statements, a congressman briefly talked about this issue, but overall, the questions searched for answers that will probably never be known.

Clemens is clearly not backing down and cannot really change his story unless he wishes to serve jail time. McNamee is in a similar situation that makes it highly unlikely either person will admit to lying.

The Mitchell Report was not constructed to ruin the reputation of current and past players. These player examples were used to prove steroid use was rampant and to show its great impact on younger athletes.

With questions that shed no light on the matter, and the obsession with petty details, Congress has once again missed the point. Hopefully, Clemens and McNamee will not. If nothing else, both of them should use their fame, or notoriety, to spread the message about the danger of steroids.

More to Discover