The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Texting is killing personal communication

Within the last decade, the texting trend has spread like wildfire. Texting is more than just a habit; it’s an addiction. The world has transformed into a virtual society, eliminating the need for any face-to-face physical interaction. Forget being annoyed by the loud cell phone talkers we all used to complain about; the crowd has suddenly been silenced. The click-clicking of our fingertips glued to our cell phones’ keyboards is the only sound that remains, and even that is threatened by noiseless touch-screen keyboards.

Our generation may be the last to converse in person. The convenience of talking to anyone and everyone, anytime and anywhere, is a technological disaster. Texting will single-handedly abolish speech, literacy, and manners. Shorthand texting lingo and T9Word will eliminate the need for anyone to know how to spell, read, or pronounce words properly. Even emotions have gone virtual: A single J or L inserted mid-text tells your cyber friend exactly what’s up. Phrases such as “grrrrr,” “blah,” “ick,” “eek,” and “ugh” all symbolize frustration, while texting giggles such as “haha,” “lol,” “lmao,” or “hehe” indicate humor and sarcasm.

Leaving the house without your cell phone is social suicide; you might as well leave the house naked. God forbid your phone should die while you are out. In that case, you might as well say hello to anxiety; your day is officially ruined. 

The other day, my mother substituted at my old high school and texted me to complain about how much students text during class and how disrespectful people have become. When I asked where she was, she responded saying that she was “in class lol.” Apparently, texting to complain about texting can be justified.

If texting alone isn’t enough to ruin real conversation, add to each phone a few applications, Internet access, and MP3 capabilities, and the world will officially turn to mush. We can all wave goodbye to letters and packages in the mail because e-mail and virtual gifts are now readily available at our fingertips.

With all this texting, it is no wonder that Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is beginning to affect a younger crowd these days. The technological disease continues to spread and there is no way to stop it other than to turn off your phone and give your fingers and eyes a rest.

However, that is nearly an impossible request. Please, someone help us!

Xoxo G2G.

Jordan Jennings is a sophomore journalism major. She can be reached for comment at [email protected].

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