The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Caruth Institute receives $2 million from Texas Instruments

Texas Instruments, headquartered in Dallas, has become a part of SMU through its recent visionary gift to The Caruth Institute for Engineering Education. The Texas Instruments Foundation’s $2 million donation went to establish a director of the Caruth Institute.

SMU chose Delores M. Etter to fill the new position. Although the selection was announced in early March, Etter will not take her position as both Director of the Caruth Institute for Engineering Education and Texas Instruments Distinguished Chair for Engineering Education until June 1.

Etter has served as assistant secretary of the Navy for research, development and acquisition, and as Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Science and Technology. She also was a member of the electrical engineering faculty of the U.S. Naval Academy, where she was the Office of Naval Research Distinguished Chair in Science and Technology.

Not only does Etter have a strong sense of duty to math, science and education, she is also determined to encourage young people to pursue careers in engineering.

“This new gift is yet another example of TI’s leadership in finding solutions to challenges in education,” President R. Gerald Turner said. “With this endowment, the TI Foundation has enabled us to appoint a leader who brings with her extensive experience in education, public service and research – a combination that uniquely suits the goal of advancing engineering education. We are grateful to the TI Foundation for its ongoing generosity in helping SMU to broaden opportunities for talented young people.”

However, Texas Instrument’s gift is helping in more ways than one. The Caruth Institute for Engineering Education, established in 2002, is constantly improving, thanks to Texas Instrument’s sponsorship. Already, the young institute has started three new educational programs, bringing nationwide notoriety.

Caruth Institute’s Infinity Project is an award-winning high school and early college math and science-based engineering program that helps teachers across the U.S. make advanced math and science courses relevant and exciting for high school students.

The Gender Parity Initiative is another “nationally recognized program that promotes interest in engineering and technology among girls and young women,” the Associated Press said.

The Caruth Institute has also started Visioneering, an annual program that selects middle school students to participate in engineering activities, allowing them to get a preview of the occupation.

SMU’s engineering program offers undergraduate, master’s and doctorate education. Aspiring undergraduate engineers can choose from 20 different areas of study, and graduate students can select from 29 different engineering programs. SMU’s goal is to recruit and teach world-class engineers by offering innovative programs that promote leadership in math and science.

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