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The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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FAILE takes over Dallas Contemporary museum

The centerpiece of the FAILE exhibit is an impressive 14 feet tall. (Courtesy of C-monster.net)
The centerpiece of the FAILE exhibit is an impressive 14 feet tall. (Courtesy of C-monster.net)
failec-monster.net.jpg
The centerpiece of the FAILE exhibit is an impressive 14 feet tall. (Courtesy of C-monster.net)

 

If you’re into contemporary pop art, where graphics and vibrant colors take center stage, the FAILE: Where Wild Won’t Break exhibit in The Dallas Contemporary art museum is a must see.

Located in the Design District of Dallas, Dallas Contemporary is an open exhibition space that prides itself in presenting Dallas art fanatics with new, original art from both regional and international artists.

FAILE: Where Wild Won’t Break, one of their newest installations, is a collaboration between Brooklyn-based artists Patrick Miller and Patrick McNeil. The installations have quickly made themselves known in the contemporary art world thanks to the artists’ use of different materials, images and technology.

Standing before all those bright colors makes it hard to look away, and the different media incorporated into each piece like copper and wood is the kind of stuff that makes you squint, take a step closer, and really draws you near.

This is especially true for the centerpiece of the exhibit, a 14-foot tower covered in some of FAILE’s signature imagery.

It includes everything from a fun, funky looking horse to a dancing wolf, several images of cars and different phrases and an octopus carrying a ballerina.

The color scheme and images are reminiscent of something you might see in a comic book.

Many of the characters in the images are positioned in a way that alludes to the idea of superheroes.

The tower also includes a couple of Texas themed pictures from things that inspired Miller and McNeil after their recent visit to Dallas.

Part of the FAILE exhibit also includes the hallmark prayer wheels, which are interactive pieces.

The prayer wheels made their debut in 2008. They are medium sized wheels hand carved from merbau, an Indo-Pacific hardwood.

Inspired from ancient Tibetan practices, the audience is allowed to turn the wheel and see a special series of images.

The wheels are meant to be an experience that resembles a form of story telling.

FAILE opened in Dallas Contemporary Sept. 21 and will be around until Dec. 22 with free admission. It’s a fun, lively collaboration that is sure to please all audiences.

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