The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Goodbye Twilight: ‘Breaking Dawn Part 2’ easily best film for franchise

 Sing Song takes stroll on Broadway
Sing Song takes stroll on Broadway

Kellan Lutz and Kristen Stewart in ‘The Twilight Saga (Courtesy of Summit Entertainment)

For those who’ve read the entire four-part Twilight Saga, prepare to be surprised: this movie is not by the book.

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 2 is a more mature, developed Twilight. After four movies, author and producer Stephanie Meyer has finally gotten it right.

The movie is still recognizably a Twilight film, with awkward pauses and forlorn faces throughout.

But with better screenwriting and breathtaking cinematography, Breaking Dawn – Part 2 shocks even the most cynical moviegoer.

While not a future Oscar winner, the film is by far the best of the series.

Michael Sheen, playing the diabolical Aro, provides a standout performance in every scene he acts in – creating humor, tension and fear in a single, high-pitched laugh.

The remainder of the cast gives unexceptional performances, including the cast’s newest edition, Mackenzie Foy, who plays Edward and Bella’s child.

The animations and computer-generated images in the movie are greatly improved from their predecessors.

The werewolves are larger than life and believable. The film even uses a computer-generated baby when Foy’s character Renesmee was born.

The most astounding part of the finale to the Twilight series, besides the incredibly entertaining plot twist, is the fact that the movie only received a PG-13 rating.

The climax includes around 5 minutes of bloodless beheadings, violent murders and computer-generated animal cruelty.

The final installment is far more mature than previous versions.

As a final encapsulation of the clichés of the series’ four-year film existence, the film ends in a montage of romantic, memorable scenes from the films previous movies.

Director Bill Condon and screenwriter Melissa Rosenberg risk upsetting Twihards across the world by deviating from the original plot, but the movie does not disappoint in action or narrative.

For its final installment, the Twilight series goes out with a bang. 

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