The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Meadows presents a weekend of entertainment

Part of the Meadows Dance Ensemble performs Ars Amatoria at the Spring 2008 Dance Concert.
Stuart Palley
Part of the Meadows Dance Ensemble performs “Ars Amatoria” at the Spring 2008 Dance Concert.

Part of the Meadows Dance Ensemble performs “Ars Amatoria” at the Spring 2008 Dance Concert. (Stuart Palley)

“Tartuffe,” the play that was immediately censored after its premiere in 1664 by the courts of Louis XIV, opened in the Greer Garson Theatre on Wednesday. The satire by Moliere was originally subtitled “The Hypocrite” after the character Tartuffe’s phony ways. Tartuffe makes his way into the Orgon household, where Orgon believes him to be a pious, honest man. As a consequence, the word “tartuffe” is used in both the French and English language as “imposter” or “hypocrite.”

Directed by Michael Connolly, associate professor and head of acting, the play will run Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets range from $7 to $13.

Tonight, the Comini Lecture Series presents “Double Aperture and Mobile Perception: Conceptualism and the Automotive Prosthetic.” Dr. Charissa Terranova, assistant professor of aestheticstudies at the University of Texas at Dallas School of Arts and Humanities, will discuss the technology of the double aperture or the art of “seeing-through” the car window looking at artists such as Dan Graham, Robert Smithson, Ed Ruscha, Paul McCarthy and Richard Prince.

The lecture begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Meadows Museum auditorium and is free with a reservation.

Also tonight, the Meadows Chorale and Concert Choir and the Meadows Women’s Ensemble will perform an evening of choral standards. The three SMU vocal ensembles will present pieces from Mendelssohn’s “Heilig” and a rendition of “Deep River.”

The concert is tonight at 8 in Caruth Auditorium. Admission is free.

The best SMU student choreography from the fall, along with spring Brown Bag performances and the senior-level showcase will come together in the Meadows Dance department’s “Best Of” concert. The works range from abstract to literal, serious to lighthearted. Performance times are 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $13 for adults, $10 for seniors and $7 for students.

The Meadows Wind Ensemble will present Classics for Wind Band on Friday at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium. The last Meadows Wind Ensemble concert of the season will premiere Meadows student David Sterrett’s “Fanfare á la Stravinsky.” The concert will also premiere the Barlow Endowment for Music Composition Prize-winning work by David Rakowski, as well as works by Michael Daugherty and Dallas composer John Gibson. The concert will have a guest appearance by one of the nation’s finest high school bands, the Duncanville High School Wind Symphony, conducted by Thomas Shine. Tickets range from $7 to $13.

The Meadows Harp Ensemble will present Alice Chalifoux Centennial Tribute this Sunday. The tribute to legendary harpist and teacher Alice Chalifoux will include Bolmimerie and other compositions of Carlos Salzedo and images and clips of Chalifoux from her 100 years. The concert will be in Caruth Auditorium. Admission is free.

Twenty-six panels from the Cathedral of Ciudad Rodrigo and a panel of unknown origin are still on exhibit at the Meadows Museum. The works are part of an altar piece executed by Fernando Gallego (c.1440 – 1507), and another painter known only as Maestro Bartolome. The pieces tell the biblical story from the Creation to the Last Judgment. Scholars from the Kimball Art Museum, the Getty Research Institute and Madrid’s Prado Museum have studied the technical and historical art aspects of the panel. The exhibition includes not only the panels, but the culmination of the works and the research. The exhibition is open until late July.

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