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The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Murderdolls’ new disc could make a great prank gift this holiday season

 Murderdolls new disc could make a great prank gift this holiday season
Murderdolls’ new disc could make a great prank gift this holiday season

Murderdolls’ new disc could make a great prank gift this holiday season

If you aren’t easily scared or disgusted, then the new Murderdolls album, Beyond the Valley of the Murderdolls, is for you.

If you do frighten easily, then, for goodness sake, stay away from this album.

The melodies of the disc are great. The band has a punkish feel, mixed with the glam-metal stylings of the 1980s. The music is generally energetic, approaching frenetic speeds at times, especially on “Graverobbing U.S.A.”

More than anything else, the album has a sense of humor. Once you get through the first three songs, your funny bone should be aroused.

With lyrics like “I’d love it if you’d spin your head for me or vomit a beautiful pea soup green,” it’s hard to take this CD seriously.

From “She was a Teenage Zombie” to “Dawn of the Dead,” the band turns its album into an audio slasher movie.

The lyrics are so deranged that you should avoid listening if you live in the same state as your mother.

“Graverobbing U.S.A” tells tales of aliens robbing graves throughout the United States. What else can you say about that?

The band boasts guitarist Tripp Eisen from Static-X and Joey Jordison from Slipknot. This could help explain why the music is good, but the lyrics are not.

The fast-paced energy that these two lend to the band distinguishes them from other “horror-show” bands like Marilyn Manson and the Insane Clown Posse.

“Love at First Fright” presents a disturbing image of a love song. It references The Exorcist, with mentions of Reagan, the possessed girl and Captain Howdy, the demon that possesses Reagan.

“She was a Teenage Zombie” gives a picture of what it would be like to take a zombie out on a date. Contrary to what you might think, Murderdolls presents this idea as more fun than a real date.

Other songs delve into even darker subject matter. “People Hate Me” contains the lyrics “homicide on parade, a bloody nose serenade.”

The song’s lyrics are as strange and disjointed as the music. It doesn’t make very much sense and seems more about trying to shock the listener than telling a story.

That tells the story of the entire album. Beyond the Valley of the Murderdolls is more about shocking the listening audience with disturbing and, at times, frightening lyrics than producing quality entertainment.

This album should delight horror movie buffs, but as far as everyone else, proceed with caution. It would, however, make a great gag gift this holiday season.

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