The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Dallas dines in the dark

Couples visiting Opaque restaurant in Dallas this weekend will dine in the dark to enhance the senses of taste, smell touch and hearing,
Photo Illustration by MICHAEL DANSER/The Daily Campus
Couples visiting Opaque restaurant in Dallas this weekend will dine in the dark to enhance the senses of taste, smell touch and hearing,

Couples visiting Opaque restaurant in Dallas this weekend will dine in the dark to enhance the senses of taste, smell touch and hearing, (Photo Illustration by MICHAEL DANSER/The Daily Campus)

Typically, being able to see your date is expected when you ask that person out to dinner. But this Valentine’s Day, the Opaque at the Aloft Dallas downtown party pad is offering “Dining in the Dark,” taking the term ‘blind date’ to a literal level.

The restaurant’s website explains that their guests go on a “journey of taste, sound and touch—all in the dark” with their significant other.

Guided to a seat in a completely dark room, guests are served meals from a set menu prepared by a ‘star’ chef. Opaque promises an experience that will enhance the senses of taste, hearing, smell and touch.

However, this concept is not new. Reality show Dating in the Dark explored what happened when three men and three women were put into various dating situations in complete darkness. The show’s contestants were then asked to choose whether they would want to see and pursue a relationship with their darkroom partner.

The show poses the question, can two people find true love on personality alone, or do looks really matter?

Well, do they? Girls spend hours preparing for a date. They have to fix their hair, get their makeup just right,and wear something that makes them look good and doesn’t make them look fat.

Guys have their energy focused on impressing their dates. Whether through looks or actions, it’s important for their date to think they are cool.

So what if none of that mattered?

What if all you had to do was walk into a pitch black room and have dinner with someone? Instead of being intimidated by the way they look or overanalyzing their body language so much so that you convince yourself they can’t stand you, you just talk.

In a society where nerves come naturally and the terror of rejection is overwhelming, the thought of asking someone on a date can be a great feat. But if the standards we feel we must meet when on a date are slimmed down to just being able to hold a conversation with someone, maybe it wouldn’t be such a tense experience. Or, maybe popping the question would still get stuck in our throats. Blindness may not give confidence.

When asked how they would feel taking someone to dine in the dark, some men believe it’s not the ideal Valentine’s date.

Charlie Wysocki said, “I don’t think it’s the best idea, actually. When going to dinner, I like to be able to look at the person I’m with. You miss out on all the small cues expressed through the face, whether they be social or romantic.”

However, some girls would be willing to give it a try.

Jacki Scioli said, “I think it would be interesting and a unique date idea. It sounds kind of awesome; it kind of freaks me out. But I would definitely say yes!”

If you’re looking for something different to do with your date or just need an incentive to calm your nerves, Opaque might help you out. If you are interested in taking your date to dine in the dark, find more information at www.tx.darkdining.com.

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