The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU professor Susanne Scholz in the West Bank in 2018.
SMU professor to return to campus after being trapped in Gaza for 12 years
Sara Hummadi, Video Editor • May 18, 2024
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Task force called for party foul

Will SMU’s new policy really have the desired effect?

SMU’s new party policy is raising eyebrows and dropping jaws. While members of all organizations will undoubtedly find this rule an attack on events that have long been a part of campus life, one thing to keep in mind is that the policy has been looming in the background for months. The sanction was a recommendation given to the SMU Task Force and in turn is meant to benefit the students, a noble idea, but is it the best?

Unfortunately, most college students don’t really care for these sorts of rules. Herein lies the problem. Much like Ke’Ana Hardy, Coordinator of African American Student Services, said, people will always find ways around the rules. Unfortunately for the university, the easiest way to get around this rule is to cut the bus parties and drive personal cars to choice bars or off-campus housing. This could lead to a spike in drunk driving, which, sooner or later, will lead to another student death.

The idea that students will simply follow the new policy, no matter how clear it is, is somewhat laughable. What in SMU’s history has given any indication that this is a plausible notion? Fraternities are known for their irresistible theme-parties, and other campus organizations have traditions that many feel just shouldn’t be tampered with.

One thing is certain: the majority of college students spent their four or five years living life to the fullest. It is a time when there is no set curfew- you can go to a party seven nights a week if you choose. The “you need my permission” approach could seriously backfire. Eighteen to 22-year-olds generally feel as if they are fully capable of making their own decisions. To be honest, some can, some can’t.

The most devastating aspect of this policy is the fact that bus services on Tuesday and Thursday nights are no more. The free, safe passage home from much-frequented bars is now unavailable.

Kevin Joseph, president of the Kappa Alpha fraternity, claimed that the school did not involve IFC with the decision. As one of the largest groups this policy will affect, fraternity men are taken aback by this sudden enactment. While two students are on the committee, it seems that the school has taken actions without getting enough input from the student community.

Hopefully SMU students will take advantage of the Dallas taxi services, and respect the fact that the Task Force is making strides to ease some of the problems the school has faced in recent years.

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