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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU alum recounts rape, survival in newly released book

SMU alum recounts rape, survival in newly released book
Korra2.JPG
Photo credit: Bridget Graf

On Tuesday, SMU alumna and former track athlete Monika Kørra signed copies of her newly released book, “Kill the Silence: A Survivor’s Life Reclaimed,” and spoke about how writing about her experience helped her healing process.

The Monika Kørra Foundation, SMU and Life Skills, an SMU student-athlete program, sponsored the event held in the Moody Coliseum Hall of Fame.

“This book is about killing the silence of rape and abuse in our society,” Kørra said. “I’m so grateful to be able to share this with all of you.”

Kørra was abducted and raped by three men on her way home from a party in Old East Dallas in December 2009. The Dallas police identified the perpetrators three days after the incident. One of the three was sentenced to 25 years in prison while the other two were sentenced for life.

Dallas Police Chief David Brown and former Dallas District Attorney Erin Hendricks spoke about Kørra’s grace and poise throughout the legal proceedings.

“Each of you being here today serves well to our democracy. It shows that we all care about this subject, and we don’t want to brush it aside or sweep it under the rug, “ said Chief Brown.

Hendricks lauded Kørra’s strength, both in and out of the courtroom.

“The first time I laid eyes on her, I expected to encounter a young, broken, shattered, fearful girl, but she was so resolute,” Hendricks said.

Kørra thanked the Dallas Police Department, the District Attorney’s office, and her friends, professors and coaches at SMU for their encouragement.

“Rape happens on this campus as any other, but I think SMU stands as a symbol for how everyone should handle this. Everyone at SMU was so supportive,” Kørra said.

Kørra began writing notes days after the incident. The first thing she wrote was the phrase “Kill the Silence,” and she wrote over 300 pages in the following months.

The decision to convert her notes into a book kickstarted Kørra’s healing process, and she said she hopes her survival will inspire others.

“I think that by being here today, we prove that love conquers hate in every way. Together we will fight this issue of rape and abuse. Together we will fight evil. And I believe we will win,” Kørra said.

Kørra signed copies of “Kill the Silence” after she spoke.

Korra1.jpg
Photo credit: Bridget Graf

Buy the book here or read an excerpt here.

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