The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

Give them a reason to leave

 Give them a reason to leave
Give them a reason to leave

Give them a reason to leave

A 2000 public statement by the United States Department of Justice acknowledged homelessness as a serious national trend. There are least 19 agencies with combined budgets of $13.7 million that are making the homeless issue a top priority, according to a survey by the Austin American-Statesman. The New England Journal of Medicine states homeless patients stay an average of 36 percent longer and cost hospitals $2,414 more than indigent patients with homes.

There are a lot of misfortunate people who live on the streets and are forced to beg every day in the city of Dallas. They clutter busy intersections with signs reading ” I’m hungry, need food to feed my family, God bless.” It’s hard not to feel bad for these people. Every day I drive past them.

I see the same people at the same intersections, spending their time – the same time that passes everyone else – cardstacking hopeless thoughts. Time plays no favorites; it’s going to pass whether you act on it or not. Holding a sign up day after day does not fulfill any responsibility. We have to hold people accountable, especially in a country where others are easily disregarded. Sometimes it seems as though our society is molded or brainwashed into thinking that we’re in a hurry to finish our to do list.

In a utilitarian point of view the answer is not to give these people money; the greatest amount of happiness they can contribute to the world would be their own. Long-term happiness provides a whole lot more happiness than immediate comforts do. Homelessness is not the same as houselessness.

Homelessness is usually the symptom of other social ills such as drug addiction, crime, teenage pregnancy, illiteracy and house-violence. There is no question that a decline in compassion occurs in individuals who have to go through this.

We can set up agencies and spend one council meeting after another talking about how to help and prevent homelessness. We can spend hour after hour on the subject until everyone’s face turns blue trying to establish the perfect plan. But the bottom line is that when people are down, as the homeless are, they need motivation to face the world. They need to realize that the world is not against them, and that everyone is confronted with fears, but being pessimistic is not the solution.

I admit this message can be hard to convey to their dispirited souls, so a one-step solution has been created and if actualized by everyone, would relieve them from asking the world to display any more pity. It’s easy.

Simply keep your money in your pocket.

The only reason I see the same people at the same intersection is because they have no reason to leave.

They’re getting money, and in some cases receiving a number of checks. There are homeless people roaming the streets who receive disability checks, unemployment checks, veteran checks and who knows what other type of check. America pays out a fortune in this manner.

I ask the city of Dallas, the state of Texas and the country of the United States of America to force people to take risks and take control of their own lives.

Life is a challenge with no guarantees. If we allow people to start thinking they’re succeeding by getting other people’s money, they’re going to continue to stick to it. Allow people to find real success. Do not give them money.

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