The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

New rap album turns many heads

 New rap album turns many heads
New rap album turns many heads

New rap album turns many heads

By way of Shady Records and Aftermath Entertainment, Dr. Dre and Eminem brought Queens-born rapper 50 Cent to the mainstream.

Get Rich or Die Tryin’ is actually 50’s second release. His first album Power of a Dollar was released on Columbia Records, but he says that it was a bad contract.

He was subsequently dropped from Columbia after being shot nine times in the summer of 2000.

Not one to let adversity stand in his way, 50 Cent gave death the middle finger, landed a new record deal and released an album that sold 1.3 million copies in its first week, according to Billboard.

50’s claim to mainstream fame was “Wanksta” featured on the 8 Mile soundtrack. His second release, “In Da Club” is a party cut produced by Dr. Dre that sparked so much hype for the album, Get Rich or Die Tryin’, it was released two days ahead of schedule.

Much of the album was produced by Dre and Eminem, but it also features a lineup of talented lesser-known producers. East coast production all-star, Rockwilder lent his hand for “Like My Style.”

The outcome is a product that mirrors 50’s personality, a New York rapper who speaks southern slang over California-flavored tracks that is equally gangsta and introspective.

Most of the time 50 shoots lines warning people that he was a crack dealer before the rap game and to not mistake him for a softy.

One of his most chilling rhymes appears on “H.E.A.T.” where he spits “if you was smart you’d be shook of me / cause I’d get tired of looking for you / spray ya mamma crib / and let ya ass look for me.”

He reveals his sensitive side on “21 Questions,” which has the hook-king Nate Dogg singing “girl, it’s easy to love me now / would you love me if I was down and out / would you still have love for me.”

Featured artists Young Buck, Lloyd Banks and Tony Yayo of 50’s crew, G Unit and Eminem lend decent vocals to this project.

Eminem’s verse on “Don’t Push Me” is full of his usual f-the-world attitude, but this time his delivery is laced with enough venom to put your adrenal glands in overdrive.

50’s appeal isn’t because of any spectacular rhyme style, it’s in his charisma. His slurry, southern drawl makes him distinctive, and his punch lines always make his rhymes worth listening to.

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