The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Cracking ‘The Da Vinci Code’

The DaVinci Code by Dan Brown has raised many questions aboutthe history of Christianity and its foundation. The book confrontsthe idea that many people at the time did not believe Jesus to bedivine and that Jesus was actually married to Mary Magdalene.

“Being a Catholic, I was asked a lot of questions aboutwhether the book is true or not,” SMU’s assistantchaplain Judy Henneberger said. “Since everybody is talkingabout the book these days, I felt it was a good time to raise thesequestions.”

A panel gathered on Wednesday to discuss the controversial bookin the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom. The Office of the Chaplain organizedand sponsored the event, which Henneberger moderated.

“There is a reason why the book is in the fiction section— it’s fiction,” religious studies professor MarkChancy said. Chancy believes the author just wanted the reader tohave a good time, and educated Christians will be able to separatefact from fiction.

Steve Landregan, an archivist of the Catholic Diocese of Dallas,agreed that there are many inaccuracies in the book but said thatthe book is enjoyable and has great moments.

“It is wonderful to see people actually interested andlearning about history,” Landregan said.

Lilian Barger is the founder of the Demaris Project, whichassists women in their spiritual journey. Barger believes the bookto be rather sexist in its views despite its inclusion of theFeminine Divine.

“The problem is that the Feminine Divine in the book isthe divine of fertility and sex and is not the description of theFeminine Divine that we need,” Barger said.

“Mary Magdalene’s role of divinity is dependent onher relationship with Jesus.”

When asked if the marriage between Jesus and Mary Magdalene ishistorically accurate, the panelists said that there may be a fewhints of it in the scriptures but there is really no evidence ofit.

“We know the names of Jesus’ parents and even hisbrothers, but no evidence of a wife,” Chancy said.

The panelists said the book did not offend them but worried themthat people who are not educated on the history of Christianitywill take the book as truth.

They said The DaVinci Code is a great work of fiction, but thatis all it is.

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