The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

‘Mind’ lacks substance, not style

Clooney’s adventure might leave moviegoers puzzled
 Mind lacks substance, not style
‘Mind’ lacks substance, not style

‘Mind’ lacks substance, not style

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind leaves audiences asking each other “what?” both during the film and as they walk out of the theater.

George Clooney’s directorial debut plays similarly to a Guy Ritchie movie – amazing cinematography without a plot.

Mind is about Chuck Barris, played by Sam Rockwell, and his double life as a game show mogul and a CIA hitman.

Clooney was recently on “Live with Regis and Kelly” and told the co-hosts he didn’t know if Barris really was a CIA agent or not – it shows.

Audiences never get an answer as to whether Barris was really an agent or if it was all in his head. After paying $5.50, you will probably want to know.

It is clear that Rockwell researched his role as he takes on the role of the sexually active, quite angry Barris.

Clooney must have noticed the chemistry between Rockwell and Drew Barrymore in Charlie’s Angels. She does well with her intriguing portrayal of Barris’ hippie wife, Penny.

She was not the only woman in Barris’ life. He had a steamy affair with sleek and sexy agent, Patricia, played by Julia Roberts. Roberts’ performance was as good as her last joint effort with Clooney, Ocean’s Eleven.

Other Ocean’s Eleven cast members Brad Pitt and Matt Damon also make cameos as game show contestants.

Clooney’s role as agent Jim Byrd isn’t easy to forget. His mustache takes on a character of its own – Sort of “Hawaii Five-O” meets “Dragnet.”

The film gives insight on the 1960s game show era. It shows how Barris worked his way into the NBC circle and eventually came into contact with ABC executives, which led to his first show, “The Dating Game.”

Clooney also had the movie’s sets operate like they did in the ’60s. He told Regis and Kelly that he had the sets move from the ground to the ceiling in between takes.

As a child Clooney visited the set of his father’s variety show, “The Nick Clooney Show,” and he based the behind-the-scenes operations on that.

While the film’s sets are realistic, the storyline is questionable to say the least. Moviegoers who want to say they saw Clooney’s first directorial project or are passionate about cinematography or the genre of game show television should check out Confessions of a Dangerous Mind.

‘Mind’ lacks substance, not style

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