The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

Letters to the editor

Drowning in denial

 

Dear Editor,

I read the editorial on hazing, and, although I thought it madesome good points, it lacked discussion on denial.

SMU acts as if hazing occurs in rare isolated incidents,whereas, in reality, if anyone wants to know if a specific greekorganization is hazing, all one has to do is ask around. Many ofthe practices of greek organizations are well known. People may actreluctant to discuss them, but most students will under the rightcircumstances.

My point is that SMU does a superficial job of ameliorating theproblem of hazing. It is idiotic to think that people do not knowwhat is occurring. Just consider how many university officials werein greek organizations during their college career. Does anyonereally believe that they were excluded from the potentiallyritualized hazing practices of their organization? If they werenot, which we have to assume as the most logical answer, then theyare simply overlooking what is going on. They are denying thereality of being affiliated with some greek organizations.

Well, I can tell you SMU is not relying on other students toreport hazing, nor is it the duty of parents. If a student reportsa hazing incident, then he is subject to myriad repercussions fromhis peers. As for the parents, many of them were in greekorganizations, but they see the hazing as a necessary ritual.

University officials have to be more proactive and involved inthe pledge education process. They cannot simply accept anorganization’s published schedule/curriculum, but they mustdo random checks to see if what is stated on paper is actuallyhappening.

The officials also need to go into classes and other placesfrequented by students to inquire into situations. Despite thepotential objection to the surreptitious means, it would be aneffective way to mitigate hazing incidents.

All I am saying is that denial is not a river in Egypt, and ifofficials truly want to dedicate themselves to ridding theuniversity of hazing, they must be more proactive andrealistic.

 

Benjamin Bingman-Tennant

History and English major

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