The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Fold’s sophomore album fails to excel band to next level

If the Chicago-bred band The Fold is going to break out, the time is now.

With pop-punk bands like Boys Like Girls, Plain White T’s, and Fall Out Boy staking claim on the Top 40 charts, mainstream music is turning toward a genre that certainly suits The Fold.

Although the growing popularity of the indie-pop, punk-rock genre opens a lot of doors for The Fold’s potential billboard attention, it also makes it difficult for the band to stand out.

The Fold cites the original emo band Sunny Day Real Estate and rock band Fountains of Wayne as influences, but its sound is more easily identifiable with that of bands like Cartel (with whom they share producers) and The Academy Is.

To share a freshly crafted individual rhythm, The Fold released its sophomore album “Secrets Keep You Sick” on May 22, a follow-up to the Tooth & Nail Records debut “This Too Shall Pass” in 2006.

But the entire album is not distinctly individual.

Some of the tracks on The Fold’s sophomore album suffer from cliché sounds. The hooks are all too familiar and the lyrics aren’t as poignantly written as others.

However, several tracks on the album may prove to be the sort of jewels that will help expand the band’s already loyal following.

The track “Faster Still” has a maturity that signals the band’s potential. Lead singer Daniel Castady’s voice is strong and the delivery sincere, and the musical accompaniment is effectively layered. The electronics and synth streamed within the song give it a much-needed uniqueness.

“Beside You Now” is another song that stays true to the band’s signature sound but features qualities that make it more than just another punk-rock melody. It is by far one of the more alluring songs on the album.

These tracks, as well as the radio-ready songs “Medicine” and “Down in Doubt And Living Without,” make the album a solid summer CD. “Secrets Keep You Sick” may not have the staying power sought after, but the album is a true testament to The Fold’s potential.

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