The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

Robbie McDonough’s resignation speech

 Robbie McDonoughs resignation speech
Robbie McDonough’s resignation speech

Robbie McDonough’s resignation speech

This speech of resignation was delivered by former Senate chief of staff, Robbie McDonough, during Tuesday’s Senate meeting.

I can still remember the day Jodie Warmbrod invited me into her office, sat me down and gave me a dream. Jodi saw potential in me, potential to lead the students of SMU.

I entered [the Senate] a year and a half ago, a firecracker ready to explode. Never before in my life had I had the opportunity to be a part of something remarkably mysterious, where making changes was business and where improving lives was the goal. I entered the Senate chamber with energy….

But now . . . well now things have changed. I am now in a position where I can do almost nothing but show up. To some it may appear that I am the rebellious one, the one who doesn’t play with the team, and they are right.

I learned a long time ago that I didn’t want to be a part of the current team. Deceit, dishonesty and a lack of faith from the Senate leadership has prohibited me and, in my opinion, the entire Senate’s ability to positively impact the students at this university.

I was once a student who, as idealist as it may be, wanted to do nothing but make life for students at this university better. I fought for things like wall s to protect students’ lives and asked questions no one else would ask.

I feel as though my heart has been corrupted by those whom I once recognized as friends and whom I once respected. From the moment I accepted the invitation to be Chief of Staff of the Student Senate, I watched its purpose minimalized.

For the past year, my character and abilities have constantly been questioned and my presence hs been ignored. I’ve been told I’m too loud, too outrageous and too passionate; but I’m not any more. I’m just worn out.

I promised myself many years ago that I would hold happiness as my most precious possession. Somewhere along the way this year I started leaving my most precious possession at the door of this chamber. I wish things were different. I wish I were able to be the Chief of Staff I had once hoped to be.

My chairs, you are each remarkable and I know that your actions and hard work are not in vain. Arlene, you have been such a kind and gentle adviser to me. I thank you for your advice and mentorship.

Britt, I want to thank you for lending an ear and an encouraging word. I appreciate all the support you have given me in the last year.

And Lyndsey, I cannot express to you how grateful I am. When no one else would listen, when it seemed like everything was upside down and inside out, you were there. This school is lucky to have you. I pray that your leadership, your positive spirit and your will to do the right thing will persevere. Together we have seen some of the worst this body can offer and despite it all, you are still willing to overcome it. You are the strong and bless you for it.

I had the fortunate opportunity to share a few words with the Emerging Leaders earlier this year. I told them this: “Find one thing you love at SMU and pursue it. Then find one thing you hate and change it.” Well it has become clear to me that I hate where I am right now. I hate the way I feel when I enter a Senate meeting.

My own morality has been privately disgraced and my esteem stomped upon. I don’t know when I started hating the dream Jodi gave me, but I know I can no longer pursue it. And so I’ve decided to resign my position as Chief of Staff effective immediately.

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