The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

Students go Medieval at annual fair

 Students go Medieval at annual fair
Students go Medieval at annual fair

Students go Medieval at annual fair

Harmony Rincon Zabala, president of the Medieval Club, beganpreparing for the fourth annual medieval fair a month ago with theintent to bring together students and educate them in the era inwhich she is interested.Attracting students with birds of prey,actors, free food, music and dancing, she and the club succeeded onThursday afternoon.

“We wanted students to enjoy a day of springtime fun… to see all these different skills and the fun of thepast,” said Bonnie Wheeler, the director of the medievalstudies program.

Rincon Zabala said that this year, as opposed to previous years,the club tried to include other departments and get a lot morepeople involved.

“It isn’t just about the medieval club. It’sabout several of the arts, and the SMU community socializingtogether,” she said.

Performers from the Scarborough Faire Rennaissance Festival wereon hand to dance and interact with students.

Brad Stewart, a performer with Scarborough Faire, has performedin other festivals, but he said that the one at SMU has been hisfavorite.

“The cast tries so much to bring you into the show.It’s much more warm and inviting,” Stewart said.

In addition to learning medieval dance moves and jousting,students also crowded around the various birds on display.

Pierre Bradshaw from the On the Wing Again bird rehabilitationfacility presented birds that can be found in Texas, including abarn owl, a red-tailed hawk and a peregrine falcon, the fastestfalcon in the world.

As wings flapped and students pointed, Bradshaw answeredquestions about the birds and their habits.

Although the birds were sophomore finance major LaudanKhotanzad’s favorite attraction, she also tried riding aunicycle, an experience she called terrifying.

Khotanzad attended the fair last year, so when she saw all thepeople in costume, she recognized what was going on.

“[The fair is] a good way to educate people while theyhave fun,” she said.

Matthew Pursley, treasurer for the Medieval Club, said thatstudents may not realize the Dark Ages are a lot like today’sworld.

“Aside from modern technology, there are still corruptpoliticians, scandal with the clergy, there were schools anduniversities. … The dark period is a lot richer than mostpeople give it credit for,” he said.

Students go Medieval at annual fair

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