The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU students gather around a bucket of markers to write an encouraging note to put in “Welcome to the Shelter” kits at event in mid-April on SMU’s campus.
Dallas homeless recovery center, The Bridge, is a home
Morgan Shiver, Contributor • June 20, 2024
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Gays rally for tax credit

It’s that dreaded day of the year again — April15th, a day when people scramble to send their hard-earned money tothe federal government.

For gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered Americans, taxesmerely serve as a reminder of their inability to legally claimtheir spouse.

While many people rush to the post office to get their taxespostmarked, GLBT Americans fight for equal rights. The Human RightsCampaign recently launched the “Tax me the same, treat me thesame,” campaign in an effort to further the demands forlegalizing gay marriages.

The campaign asks people to write letters to Congress to informthem they paid their taxes, and they want equal rights. It alsorequests individuals donate their tax refunds to the cause.

Randy Hubach, president of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual,Transgender, Straight Organization, said he finds it to be anaggravating time for older men and women trying to have a regularfamily life.

“It can be frustrating because some families can beconsidered a real family while others are not,” he said.

The campaign has been a strong force in legalizing gay marriage,especially since President Bush’s speech in late Februarycalled for Congress to pass and ratify an amendment to theConstitution that defined and protected marriage as a union betweena man and woman.

Hubach disagrees with the president’s efforts.”It’s just a matter of principles,” he said.”There’s no good reason for some families to be able tocount their children on their taxes, and some families not even berecognized.”

This issue of equal civil marriage rights for same-sex coupleshas been a highly debated topic over the past few months, stirringmany mixed emotions from students.

“I disagree with it being called gay marriage, but I dothink there should be some governmental unions for tax, insuranceand other legal purposes,” sophomore Melanie McCormick said.”I’m all for a governmentally recognized union, but tome, marriage is between and man and a woman.”

Senior Dewitt Dawkins disagreed, saying, “I’m finewith people marrying who ever they want to marry. I can’t seethem [GLBTs] being upset over not being able to file jointly. Thatseems like the last of their worries right now.”

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