The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU students gather around a bucket of markers to write an encouraging note to put in “Welcome to the Shelter” kits at event in mid-April on SMU’s campus.
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Morgan Shiver, Contributor • June 20, 2024
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What the heck do they mean?

Ed Board breaks down the meaning of rap song lyrics

While Ed Board has been out clubbing lately, we’ve noticed everyone joyously singing along to the music as they bump and grind. But do you know the meaning behind those catchy lyrics? Ed Board looked at some of the most-played songs in bars and deciphered the lyrics on urbandictionary.com. Some of them are a given, others were a little tricky. And others weren’t appropriate to print!

The line, “inside peanut butter, outside jelly” is talking about the details of a car. (The next line is, “seven days of the week, seven different Chevy’s.”) The inside is a tan leather the color of peanut butter, and the outside is painted a deep purple, like grape jelly. And you probably thought this was something dirty. Get your mind out of the gutter.

Ludacris’s hit, “Money Maker” is talking about, what else, a girl shaking her gluteus maximus. That was pretty obvious.

When Young Dro and T.I. are asking you to “let your shoulder lean,” it simply is a form of relaxing in which you lean one of your shoulders lower than your other. It is also considered a dance move in which you lean your shoulders from side to side.

Well, Chamillionaire doesn’t want to get caught “Ridin’ Dirty,” but what exactly does it mean to ride dirty? There are several different versions of this definition, but essentially it means to get caught doing something bad. An example would be getting caught cheating on your significant other or driving with warrants on your name.

Here’s a strange one: the song “Chicken Noodle Soup” by DJ Webstar. He’s not singing about the deliciousness of a bowl of Campbell’s. The chicken noodle soup is actually a dance created in Harlem, N.Y. It is a modified version of the tone wop, which consists of pulling your arms back and swinging your legs “like you just hit a rock.”

Finally, we think everyone is a little confused about Fergie’s new one, “London Bridge.” Basically a female’s ‘London bridge’ is her underwear. The line is, “how come every time you come around my London, London bridge wanna go down?” Can you put the two together?

Ed Board hopes this little lesson in hip-hop lingo has enlightened you enough to enjoy these songs to their fullest. Next time you’re shaking your money maker in the club you can have the satisfaction of knowing the meaning behind the lyrics. Hey, maybe you could use it as a conversation starter. Instead of, “Can I buy you a drink?” why not say, “Do you want to come see my peanut butter and jelly Chevy?”

We’re not making any promises, but at least you’ll get points for creativity.

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