The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Morgan Shiver, Contributor • June 20, 2024
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Cage adds yet another bust to his list of B-movies

“Bangkok Dangerous” is a title that tells you two things: the setting and the theme. Little did I know when walking into the movie that this would be all of the content of the movie: “Bangkok” and “dangerous.”

Joe (Nicholas Cage) begins his narrative discussing the four rules of an assassin, and later brings these rules back into the story. However, the guidelines lack any substance throughout the film. Audience members do not know the main character’s motive for killing until the end of the movie and are clueless about the life of Joe, or lack thereof.

The movie did develop some key parts that could have made it great, but they were poorly executed. As far as action is concerned, the movie has some amazing effects, including a chase scene at Thailand’s famous “Floating Market,” not to mention some pretty creative murders.

Along with the action presented, the film also adds some cultural elements from Thailand such as tea ceremonies and the life of a tourist, but overall lacked the stamina needed to make this film worthy of paying $10 at NorthPark Mall.

The theme of “separation from reality and the conflict that it presents” is dominant in the film and creates some depth to the movie as a whole, but cannot rescue the characters from the inherent flaws of screenplay.

The anonymity of the characters did enhance suspense (that there were never any last names) but it later contributed to confusion since there was no background on any of the characters. The movie only consisted of the present, which, although it paralleled Joe’s perspective to forget the past, the characters were less personable because so little was known about their lives.

Every movie must have a love interest and although this role is usually typical, “Bangkok Dangerous” gives it an unusual twist. Joe’s girl is deaf, and therefore is oblivious to his dealings. To rectify this, the two create their own world of silence and hand signals. Her lack of hearing is endearing, but the fact that even her name is up for speculation creates a feeling of confusion when she is onscreen. Though this may cause a girl to “ooh!” and “ah!” their relationship seems empty and lackluster.

One of the rules of an assassin is not to trust anyone, so of course, like any typical character, Joe begins to care about his lackey for hire, Kong (Shahkrit Yamnarm). This of course complicates the plot, but at the same time lacks the bond parallel to “The Karate Kid” and the emotion felt in “Wanted.”

If you want to see blood and guts, but not be completely grossed out, you will probably enjoy this film. The movie compares to Cage’s new look with his long, messy and greasy looking hair: just cut it off and add some character elements. Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

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