The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Former Get Up Kid gains new ‘Confidence’

Matt Pryor performs at the House of the Blues in support of his new solo album.
Sommer Saadi
Matt Pryor performs at the House of the Blues in support of his new solo album.

Matt Pryor performs at the House of the Blues in support of his new solo album. (Sommer Saadi)

The stage was bare. The room was small.

It was the ideal setting for Matt Pryor, former Get Up Kids frontman and current New Amsterdams lead singer, to indulge in his folksy side.

Pryor played the Pontiac Garage room at the House of Blues on Aug. 22. The show was part of his first solo tour supporting his debut solo album “Confidence Man.” It is Pryor’s first full tour in five years, but it might be one of many to come. “Confidence Man” is Pryor’s flagship disc on his extensive discography to be released under his own name.

With his latest album, Pryor leans toward an acoustic sound, much different from his band The Get Up Kids formed in 1995. The Get Up Kids was considered one of the archetypal indie bands of the “emo” era.

The sound of his solo project, however, is not much different from his side project The New Amsterdams, which he formed in 2000. The fact that he self-produced and self-recorded the entire album in his garage, however, does warrant the claim that “Confidence Man” is his first solo project.

The album is made up of 15 tracks dripping with acoustic charm. No song carries a distinctive edge or infectious hook, but every song carries a subtle allure. It’s the same subtle allure that entices the New Amsterdams’ fans. Pryor’s solo sound is only slightly quieter, so for fans who can’t get enough mellow guitar strums and sweetly sung vocals, the album is gold.

Despite his indie, punk-pop roots, Pryor has found his acoustic niche. And if the reaction from the audience at the House of Blues is any indicator, his fans don’t mind.

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