The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

My quest to learn the musical instrument struck a chord much greater than the beautiful sound of a perfect stroke.
I decided to learn the guitar, but I walked away learning more about life
Bella Edmondson, Staff Editor • June 19, 2024
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Republicans rally for Bush

President ends campaign trail at Moody Coliseum
+Republicans+rally+for+Bush
Republicans rally for Bush

Republicans rally for Bush

President George W. Bush spent the final hours of his franticday speaking to a packed Moody Coliseum Monday night, ending hisseven-stop tour before Super Tuesday.

Joined by his family, Republican candidates and celebrities,Bush addressed the eager crowd and touched on his platform’stalking points, essentially defining his vision for the presidencyand discussing the differences between him and the Democraticcandidate, Sen. John Kerry.

Bush said there was “no better place to end [thecampaign],” and SMU was happy to oblige, preparing for theevent extensively after its sudden announcement late Thursday.Indeed, this last rally in Dallas signifies a good luck charm,according to the First Family, who also ended their campaign forgovernor here 10 years ago.

Dennis Simon, a professor in the political science departmentsaid the Hilltop is the “logical choice.”

Not only did the First Lady graduate from SMU, but Dallas hasalso been the site of a bitter congressional race pittingRepublican Pete Sessions against Democrat Martin Frost.

“I think [that campaign] had a lot to do with theselection of SMU,” Simon said.

Sessions, who also spoke at the rally, introduced the First Ladyand received praise from the President in his remarks.

With all endorsements aside, Bush addressed the hot topics ofthe campaign including taxes, education, healthcare, lawsuits andfamily values. Above all though, Bush said, “This electioncomes down to who you trust,” noting the conflicting signalsthat he says Kerry is sending the American public.

The main difference between the two front-runners was quitesimple.

“He’s from Massachusetts and I’m fromTexas,” he said to the cheering crowd.

Greeted by anti-Kerry booing, his followers even knew by heartthe quotation that Bush calls the moment his opponent”entered the flip-flop hall of fame.” But as the lownoise filled the room, there were still some silent supports ofKerry.

“Although I may not agree with President Bush’spolicies and actions,” said Katie Beth Adkins, a first-yearbusiness and CCPA major from South Carolina, “I still find itan essential part of American democracy to respect and support myPresident, regardless of his political affiliation.”

However anti-Bush attendees likely agreed with his idea that”the most important part of the American presidency is toprotect the American people and … know where you want tolead [the country].”

“I’m talking about the day that is coming,” hesaid, explaining his idea of a great leader.

“The president must lead with clarity and purpose,”said Bush, continuing on to note that a President should not waiverin principle simply to cater to the latest polls.

Polls have played an important role in this election cycle:adding to its unknown outcome. Even national polls have been unableto agree on a projected winner and all indicate the race will comedown to every last vote.

Today the President and First Lady cast their ballots near theirranch in Crawford, Texas began campaigning.

Republicans rally for Bush

Republicans rally for Bush

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