The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU students gather around a bucket of markers to write an encouraging note to put in “Welcome to the Shelter” kits at event in mid-April on SMU’s campus.
Dallas homeless recovery center, The Bridge, is a home
Morgan Shiver, Contributor • June 20, 2024
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Google announces cloud service

Google will make its presence known in yet another sector of the Internet-online storage service.

The search engine giant plans to release their online storage service sometime next week. It is rumored to be called GDrive. This highly anticipated release of GDrive will unify Google’s existing photo, document and music storage by offering 1GB of free storage.

Offering 1GB of free storage doesn’t appear to hold a competitive edge for GDrive seeing that market leader Dropbox currently offers up to 2GB of free storage before charging a set rate of $9.99 per month for up to 50GB.

“I love using Dropbox because I can keep a lot of big files in one place that’s easy to access,” said Marie Harris, sophomore. “And the best part is I don’t have to pay for it.”

The game changer here is that Google’s GDrive will serve as a way to connect Google’s apps, which will fundamentally benefit its established users. There will apparently be a domain-specific version for Google Apps customers. For those who are not connected with all things Google, the service will have an API for third-party apps, allowing them to store files in the service.

Online tech blog, Tech Crunch, warns that other online storage services could suffer from Google’s launch of GDrive. Google’s arsenal of internet-connected servers, particularly Chrome OS and Android, will largely contribute to Google’s success in the online storage service sector.

Since Google has the most internet-connected servers in the world, they will not have to work nearly as hard as competitors such as Dropbox or Microsoft’s Sky Drive to build or maintain a solid user base. 

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