The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

My quest to learn the musical instrument struck a chord much greater than the beautiful sound of a perfect stroke.
I decided to learn the guitar, but I walked away learning more about life
Bella Edmondson, Staff Editor • June 19, 2024
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Mustangs lose to Okla. State

New SMU bracelets prove to be more than just a fad for fans
 Mustangs lose to Okla. State
Mustangs lose to Okla. State

Mustangs lose to Okla. State

Across the country, people have been making a statement with rubber, ever since the flash of the yellow LiveSTRONG bracelet dazzled our eyes this past spring. Americans have revolutionized fundraising through silicon bands. Whether it benefits cancer research, supports charities or helps build a new stadium, this fashion statement has turned into a fad.

SMU’s Sports Marketing Advisory Committee unveiled its blue SMU Mustang silicon bracelets at last night’s SMU/Oklahoma State basketball game. The bands support local and national charities, with the proceeds benefiting Rainbow Days, a program that allows underprivileged inner-city children to attend sporting events and the American Red Cross to aid hurricane victims in Florida.

SMAC, in conjunction with the Athletics Marketing Department, created the bracelets in hopes of increasing school spirit and giving back to the community. “While studying social trends in class, we discussed the success of the LiveSTRONG bands and I knew this concept would succeed on SMU’s campus,” said Thomas Greene, a member of SMAC and intern for the athletics program.

“A little school spirit can go along way by reinforcing our dedication and support of the football team as well as the other varsity programs,” Greene said. The wristbands will go on sale soon at the Hughes-Trigg Student Center and other on-campus locations for $3 a bracelet, or two for $5. SMU hopes to sell at least 5,000 bracelets.

The Lance Armstrong Foundation in Austin, pioneered the first LiveSTRONG band. The bright-yellow rubber bracelet sells for $1, and is printed with the famous six-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong’s mantra “LiveSTRONG”. Supporters create a fashionably loud statement in support of cancer research.

“American’s love success stories,” said Cydney Wells, a native Texan. “Lance Armstrong is the same as any other cancer survivor. But he’s the best in the history of cycling, an incredible athlete and absolutely inspiring.”

Copycats have followed suit with their own colors and inscriptions. The Kroger Co. joined with the Stefanie Spielman Fund for breast cancer research, and has sold 20,000 pink “Champions of Hope” bracelets, in Columbus, Ohio. They are hoping to sell 100,000 during, breast-cancer awareness month in October.

The Carolina Panthers have clawed their way into this growing trend with their blue “Keep Pounding” band. Mark Fields, a current linebacker for the team overcame Hodgkin’s disease this past season. Last year, during cancer treatments, he encouraged the team to “Keep Pounding”, while in the NFC Wild Card Playoffs.

The popular partnership of the wristbands with sports teams is on the rise, especially at college campuses across the country. The University of Minnesota’s Goal Line Club, a football booster, implemented their bracelets in early October to raise money to build a new stadium. The “Back to Campus” maroon-colored wristbands cost $1 and the University hopes to raise $30,000 from the sale of 50,000. “What they’ve done is step ahead of the athletics department and the University,” said Joel Maturi, the University’s Athletics Director. “They’re trying to raise money, but to me it’s an awareness thing; nothing more, nothing less.”

“Team United” imprinted on Virginia Tech’s orange rubber bands sell for $1 as well. The football team partnered with the United Way to raise money and support the Hokies. Tech’s motto lets supporters belong to the fashion trend in support of improving people’s lives. All proceeds will go to the United Way of Montgomery County.

SMAC’s Greene got much of his information about the bands from studying the Virginia Tech trend. Greene even ordered a shipment of “Team United” bands.

Last week, Ohio State University kicked off its wristband program and sold 22,000 maroon “Tradition, People, Excellence” bracelets at Ohio Stadium. The profits will help fund scholarships in 36 of the University’s sports.

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