The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

My quest to learn the musical instrument struck a chord much greater than the beautiful sound of a perfect stroke.
I decided to learn the guitar, but I walked away learning more about life
Bella Edmondson, Staff Editor • June 19, 2024
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DSO Beethoven Festival surprises

Since Ludwig van Beethoven created his musical compositions, they have been considered some of the most influential works in musical history, especially his nine symphonies.

The Dallas Symphony Orchestra’s Beethoven Festival opened last week at the Myerson Symphony Center with the first two of these symphonies.

The two pieces, both classical works, are surprising in the way they differ from Beethoven’s contemporaries and even from his own work later in life.

Conductor Gilbert Varga, who is known for his masterful baton technique, made his Dallas Symphony Orchestra debut leading the musicians this past weekend.

His exaggerated movements were comical to some and perhaps distracting to others.

Regardless, the movements conveyed his deep connection to the music while his overall performance proved why he is an internationally renowned conductor.

Though Stravinsky’s (another composer) “Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments” divided the two symphonies because it is considered neoclassical, the style was much closer to baroque.

It was a strange clash to hear the piece between the two classical Beethoven symphonies and it seemed that much of the audience felt similarly.

Still, it was interesting to hear that the piece, written in the 1920s, has some characteristics of the classical past and some more modern characteristics that tie it to jazz.

The connection between the two styles could be clearly heard thanks to Russian pianist Kirill Gerstein’s masterful technique in both genres.

The festival will continue through Dec. 2, with each week featuring Beethoven’s other symphonies. Tickets range from $17 to $138.

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