The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

My quest to learn the musical instrument struck a chord much greater than the beautiful sound of a perfect stroke.
I decided to learn the guitar, but I walked away learning more about life
Bella Edmondson, Staff Editor • June 19, 2024
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‘A Doll’s House’ emits genuine acting

Last weekend, in the depths of the Meadows basement, a handful of talented students performed Henrik Ibsen’s play, “A Doll’s House.”

The drama centers around the relationship between a husband and wife. The classic play questions the role that marriage played in society. “A Doll’s House” goes about this in a way that is not too dense and still manages to keep a sense of wit and humor.

The one thing that really stood out in this rendition of “A Doll’s House” was how genuine and real every movement, line and emotion was. The audience could tell that the director was meticulous about making the play seem natural and not forced.

The first action on stage was when the main character Nora opened the door and entered the scene. Instead of just opening the door and walking inside, Nora fumbled with her bags, searched for her keys, fitted them into the lock, and finally unlocked the door.

This seems like a simple and ordinary thing to do, but it is just one of the many examples of the care that was taken to contrast the realistic aspects of the characters with their absurdities that are revealed later in the play.

The emotions also seemed extremely authentic. During the play, Nora gets caught in a web of lies of her own creation. Her angst, her anxiety and her passion all made it easy for the audience to empathize with her, as naïve as she may have been.

The actor playing Nora’s husband Torvald’s arrogance was also very natural. The way that he looked down to Nora by saying things like “I guess I’ll have to take you as you are” not only seemed real but also made the entire audience laugh at how absurd he was.

Although the frankness and heart of the actors was endearing, no play is without error. The actors seemed to trip up on the dialogue during the most intense scenes, just making it all the more obvious that the continuity of the lines was halted.

These little “issues” didn’t detract from the play, however, There was little to no advertising for the play. The play is a classic that is studied by most theatre students, and it definitely deserved more publicity than it received. 

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