The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Morgan Shiver, Contributor • June 20, 2024
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Get screened for depression

The college years are a time when it is easy to become overwhelmed by responsibilities and distressed about relationships. Add that to a host of factors including brain chemistry, genetics, negative thoughts and side effects from prescription medications and many students become clinically depressed.

Yet two-thirds of those people with symptoms of depression do not seek treatment.

Ten percent of college students have been diagnosed with depression, including 13 percent of college women, according to the National Mental Health Association.

While the percentage may seem small, there are about 5,000 undergraduate students at SMU. That means that there are approximately 500 students on campus who are depressed.

The Memorial Health Center is offering free, anonymous screening to students, faculty and staff today in honor of National Depression Screening Day and Mental Illness Awareness Week.

The national program has grown over the last several years to reach more than 85,000 people across the United States.

“The screening determines the student’s depression level and then they can meet with a counselor for a short consultation and get a referral,” said Cathey Soutter, coordinator of psychological services for women and gender issues.

Participants will learn about the causes, symptoms and treatments of depression and watch a short video.

According to the NMHA, depression is one of the most easily treatable medical conditions. Treatment can save lives by preventing suicide.

Often treatment is antidepressant medications, psychotherapy or a combination of the two.

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