The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU professor Susanne Scholz in the West Bank in 2018.
SMU professor to return to campus after being trapped in Gaza for 12 years
Sara Hummadi, Video Editor • May 18, 2024
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HE SAID

On the ballot: Proposition 2

publicly discussing controversial issues is a big no-no unless you know who you’re speaking to. As a matter of fact, I’ve been a victim of this circumstance in what little part of the business world I’ve experienced. At my most recent job as a member of the promotions team for 97.9 The Beat, an innocent dialogue with a coworker was slandered, and accusations were brought against me on the basis of lies. So, to evade the same misperceptions of my character or perhaps just avoid the hate e-mails, allow me to set the record straight. I could care less what race a person is, sexual orientation one prefers, religion one chooses to believe or whether or not someone likes the Cowboys. But, because the topic of this article involves homosexuality, I feel that reiteration of my stance is necessary.

Kevin cuts my hair, Jake is my cousin, Karen was my next door neighbor and Daniel is a dear friend. These people are all apart of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community, and I respect them just as much as I ever would – regardless of their sexual orientation. Supporting Proposition 2 does not, by any means, undermine the love people have for gays and lesbians. I would love for homosexuals to have the right to get married, but unfortunately I don’t think the state of Texas, let alone the world, is ready to become advocates of invalidating such a sacred part of life.

Texans go to the polls on Nov. 8 to decide whether or not to amend the state’s constitution to ban gay marriage. For those from the other 49 states of the country, or even some Texans, the proposed amendment reads: “The constitutional amendment providing that marriage in this state consists only of the union of one man and one woman and prohibiting this state or a political subdivision of this state from creating or recognizing any legal status identical or similar to marriage.”

On a technical issue, opponents of this proposition, such as some Dallas-area business owners, believe the marriage amendment, should it pass, will hinder the state’s business development. If voters accept the proposition, some say it would make Texas less competitive in hiring and recruiting. Ed Board addressed this issue in Thursday’s editorial by saying that “private companies will be allowed to take away health benefits that are currently available to unmarried couples and their children.” However, private companies are always allowed to do what they want. That’s what makes them “private.” And, as for Ed Board persuading readers to vote against Prop 2 solely based on the fact that the KKK supports it, doesn’t do the issue much justice. Adolf Hitler adored art, especially Picasso,.Therefore, boycotting anything signed by the famous artist only seems reasonable according to the article, right? The insinuations and technicalities of Proposition 2, like domestic-partner benefits, are easily used as evidence to oppose the constitutional alteration. This is exactly why I choose to not go this route. Gay marriage is on such a deep level of morality and ethics that it can’t be viewed objectively. Ed Board and many others look at this topic on the surface, which is why they swing and miss. Supporters of gay marriage wonder why most people are reluctant to the feel the same way. Answer: religion. Ed Board dismisses the argument of religion as if it’s air. The article makes the claim that banning gay marriage violates “the rights this country was founded upon.” Whether you want to believe it or not, this country was undoubtedly founded on religion! Of United States citizens, 76 percent are Christians, and the next two biggest groups are Jews and Muslims. None of these religions advocate homosexual marriages.

Think about the implications or results of advocating same-sex marriages. Imagine penciling in some wording throughout the Bible. Don’t you think it would be a risky move to violate the sanctity and sacredness of holy matrimony? And, even if you don’t, are you sure this state, this country, this world, is ready to take such a large step?I believe every minority should share the rights we all share, but the issue of Proposition 2 and perhaps eventually legalizing gay marriage is a slippery slope. I feel as if publicly advocating the violation of years of historical and religious sanctity would be an enormous move that this country is not ready to make.. Vote what you believe is the right choice. Make a decision based upon the technical pieces of evidence, but more importantly, your morals and convictions, not what Ed Board asks of you.

Brian Wellman is a first-year marketing major. He may be contacted at [email protected].

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