The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

SMU professor Susanne Scholz in the West Bank in 2018.
SMU professor to return to campus after being trapped in Gaza for 12 years
Sara Hummadi, Video Editor • May 18, 2024
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‘Valentino’ proves even design gods are mortals

Whoever came up with the phrase, “the emperor has no clothes,” clearly hadn’t met Valentino Garavani.

From the mundane to the insane, the documentary film “Valentino: The Last Emperor” captures the comical and enchanting human essence of famed couturier Valentino.

Director Matt Tyrnauer takes full advantage of the all-access/final-cut privilege and portrays Valentino as a relatable, not-quite-everyman pursuing his true passion for design and creativity.

Tyrnauer artfully separates the film into what feels like three acts: The god-like grandeur of Valentino’s three-day 45th Anniversary celebration, the seesawing of his ultimate decision to retire and the sale of the Valentino label to private equity firm Permira.

Audiences enter not only the decadent runway elements of this creator’s life, but also the inner psyche and myriad friendships of Valentino’s dolce vita.

The celebrity cache, yachts and chateaus are merely the sequins on the dress of this film.

The true substance and fabric surprisingly comes from the exploration into the longtime, complex partnership between Valentino and Giancarlo Giammetti.

The symbiosis between the two is at times hilarious and poignant as they run gamut of emotion during the two years of filming.

Boiling down to the basics of human need and nature – albeit it extravagant – this film is not just for fashionistas, but also for anyone looking for an artistic escape.

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