The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

My quest to learn the musical instrument struck a chord much greater than the beautiful sound of a perfect stroke.
I decided to learn the guitar, but I walked away learning more about life
Bella Edmondson, Staff Editor • June 19, 2024
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Sexism not the issue for Miley

To be blunt, the negative reaction to Miley Cyrus’ attire and her and Robin Thicke’s dance is perfectly acceptable and even… commendable. But it’s not because of some sexist idea subliminally programmed into everyone’s mind. It’s because when we see someone of fame and fortune make a fool of themselves, we call them out. We do it with politicians, authors, members of the scientific community, and Lord forbid, the most public of them all, artists.

Now, to say that Cyrus’ gender has nothing to do with it would be wrong, but to say that we have overly scrutinized her BECAUSE of her gender would be even more wrong. Let’s take a quick look down memory lane to see how we chastise those who act foolishly in the public forum. Remember Adam Lambert? On Nov. 22, 2009, Lambert performed “For Your Entertainment” at the American Music Awards of 2009. The controversial performance, which was the night’s finale, showed Lambert kissing a male bassist and grabbing the crotch of another. ABC received about 1,500 telephoned complaints and cancelled Lambert’s November 25 performance on “Good Morning America.”

Now was that sexist of us to find fault in his performance?

Discussing the incident in a Rolling Stone interview, Lambert stated: “Female performers have been doing this for years—pushing the envelope about sexuality—and the minute a man does it, everybody freaks out. We’re in 2009—it’s time to take risks, be a little more brave, time to open people’s eyes and if it offends them, then maybe I’m not for them. My goal was not to piss people off, it was to promote freedom of expression and artistic freedom.”

While I may not agree with how he chose to express his artistic freedom, Lambert is DEAD ON in his interpretation of the REAL sexual stigma that needs to end. Sure, if you want to see Lady Gaga singing and dancing around in G-strings and whatnot, you can have that (although Madonna did it first). But don’t you dare raise an eyebrow when Justin Timberlake or Kanye West (whose performances were not in any way sexualized but specifically taken in an artistic direction – Kanye especially) start stripping and getting down.

Now back to the matter at hand: think about this era. Speaking from a virgin, Christian perspective, I get to see the sexualization of both genders from the outside in. And when I see it happen, it’s like a cry for desperation. It’s seriously as if someone has to place so much in this sexual identity because they can’t invest it somewhere else. It’s not because culture tells us it’s okay, it’s because we see it as some alternative route to forging an identity. To bring this back to Cyrus would be to say this: she can sing wonderfully, play piano, and strum a guitar. And instead of fostering those talents and saying “listen to what beautiful music I can make,” she trashes it and says “look at me struggle to advance my identity by placing my hope in my sexuality.”

She’s 20. TWENTY —younger than many of us. The government won’t even allow her to drink. Albeit, maybe she’s being pushed. But it’s still her life (as she states in her song, “It’s my mouth, I can say what I want to.”) But why does she think it’s a good idea to try sex appeal before she tries something more enriching for her career? Better yet, do we secretly/publically think that’s a good idea as well? And do we really want to end up like Cyrus? In short, don’t be your own stigma.

Norwood is a sophomore majoring in political science and philosophy.

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