The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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ColliegiateACB meets Twitter with Yik Yak

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Gentile is a senior majoring in public relations.

The new app Yik Yak has exploded across the SMU campus in the past two weeks. How it works is pretty simple. The app allows students to say whatever they want about whoever they want — anonymously. No accounts. No passwords. Nothing. It’s CollegiateACB meets Twitter, except a user only sees yaks from other users in a close proximity.

On the surface Yik Yak may not seem like a big deal, but pairing anonymity with a college campus has created an environment for the segregated social scene to post jabs at each other’s fraternity and sorority among other things. The least “popular” kid on campus could be the funniest person on Yik Yak. Currently, the Yik Yak feed is flooded with posts asking to write in Nic Moore for president. I think it is quite humorous and of course, very entertaining.

Yik Yak is a particular problem for college administrators because there is almost nothing that can be done, because all posts are anonymous. A school could block Yik Yak on its local network, but 3G networks on phones and tablets make that a non-issue. So the most the university can do, really, is speak out against it.

Yik Yak is the first social venting app to incorporate smartphones’ location services to unite an area of “Yakkers” and create a community.

I am curious to see if SMU administrators will try to regulate use of Yik Yak. Until they do, Yak on!

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