The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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iPhone 4S disappoints customers, Jobs never did

Steve Jobs displays the iPod mini in 2006. Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO who invented and marketed gadgets that transformed everyday technology, died Wednesday. He was 56.
Associated Press
Steve Jobs displays the iPod mini in 2006. Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO who invented and marketed gadgets that transformed everyday technology, died Wednesday. He was 56.

Steve Jobs displays the iPod mini in 2006. Jobs, the Apple founder and former CEO who invented and marketed gadgets that transformed everyday technology, died Wednesday. He was 56. (Associated Press)

When I found out Santa was actually a 5-foot-3-inch blonde, I was upset, maybe even a little disappointed. Granted, I was in the seventh grade, so it was about time I knew, but still, Christmas just wasn’t the same.

Each year I marked my calendar and waited for Dec. 25, anticipating the amazing surprises that were in store. From the time the elves stopped making my toys, the magic of Christmas diminished.

Over the last few weeks, the excitement and delight that I used to feel on Christmas Eve was back. I had a new day to mark on my calendar: Oct. 4, the day the iPhone 5 would be revealed.

When Verizon Wireless acquired the iPhone in March, I decided to forgo the trendy device. I wanted the newest version, not some old, outdated iPhone 4. I would wait.

Since March, I’ve had two Blackberries stolen, and when I say stolen, I mean I left them on a table for someone else to take. As a result, I have been using my sister’s old phone, which conveniently has no ringer or Internet access and a broken zero button. I am a journalist without technological access to the outside world, and I am going crazy.

All of that was going to change on Oct. 4, or at least it was supposed to.

Since Apple released the invitation to their event titled “Let’s Talk iPhone,” I have been excited, giddy and preparing for my new toy.

In anticipation, I called the Verizon Wireless store on Northwest Highway more times that I would like to admit. Each time I asked to be put on the waitlist for the iPhone 5, and the man on the other end asked, “Who says there will be an iPhone 5?” I repeatedly told the man, “I know it’s coming,” before I got frustrated and hung up the phone.

As much as it pains me to admit this, on Tuesday I found out that Verizon was right; there is no iPhone 5. We’ve all been scammed, tricked, misled and deceived.

For months the blogosphere has gone crazy, predicting what Steve Jobs and Co. could possibly come up with to enhance the brilliant device. Would it have a bigger screen, slimmer body, aluminum case? The answer to these questions is no.

While Tim Cook, Apple’s new CEO, tried to excite the crowd, those at the event in Cupertino, Calif., were tweeting that this couldn’t possibly be the big news that Apple had hyped. Unfortunately, it was.

The iPhone 4S is a mediocre upgrade at best, with noticeable changes being an 8-megapixel camera, video camera that shoots 1080p high-definition video and a talking personal assistant called Siri.

Clearly, I am not the only one feeling underwhelmed by the latest iPhone. Cook’s dull presentation left many pleading for the return of Steve Jobs, who could always be counted on to bring excitement, energy and substance to the Apple events.

Apple disciples looked up to Jobs, worshipping him as their leader, icon and the ultimate innovator. Like many devotees, I felt the event just wasn’t the same. I missed Jobs, who each year stayed as loyal to his followers as he did his clothing.

Since 1998, Jobs has taken the stage at Apple events sporting his Levi 501 jeans, New Balance sneakers and black St. Croix turtleneck, while delivering exhilarating messages and revolutionary ideas to the throngs of fans and supporters. He has remained a constant to Apple and their fans, and his commitment to creativity, imagination and Apple supporters is truly missed.

I was writing this piece when I heard that Steve Jobs died. I couldn’t help but look down at the Apple computer I was typing on and think of all the ways that Jobs inspired and encouraged students, inventors and educators who recognized his passion and dedication to technology and innovation.

Jobs was a pioneer and creative genius at the forefront of change and technology. He demanded more from people, computers, software and technology, while maintaining an extraordinary vision, which few could fathom.

An idea, which started from his parents’ garage, transformed into a billion dollar company and is currently the largest, publicly traded company in the world.

Jobs created a fan base of devoted followers who love the legends, ideas and beliefs that we can always do better, create better and invent technologies that “can make life easier,” allowing us to “touch people we might not otherwise.”

Although I may be frustrated with the release of the iPhone 4S and disappointed that technology did not keep up with my hunger for innovation, I can’t help but wonder where the world and technology would be without Steve Jobs.

Jobs has created a global thirst for learning, knowledge, creativity and technology. As a result, we refuse to stay satisfied and demand newer, better and brighter designs. Jobs showed us what it’s like to invent, learn and inspire, while changing the world one computer, smartphone and tablet at a time.

As we reflect upon the life of Steve Jobs, a 2005 commencement speech that Jobs gave at Stanford University suddenly has greater poignancy and meaning.

“No one wants to die,” Jobs said. “Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you.”  

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