The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Morgan Shiver, Contributor • June 20, 2024
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Bin Laden’s death incites questions about value of life

With the recent unexpected events, a lot of emotions and opinions have come about on the subject of whether or not bin Laden’s death was justifiable. Recognizing the fact that he deserved to be punished for his evil doings, did he deserve to die?

Without sounding like I am completely disregarding all that bin Laden did to this country and all the lives he took, as a Christian, I am not sure we have a right to take his life.

Do we really have the authority to decide who lives or dies, or should we just leave these decisions up to God? Are we better people because of our retaliation, or does the saying two wrongs don’t make a right apply in this situation? Should our actions be looked at as any better than his?

Although he was not innocent, he too was a human being and was given the right to life. Is it only if there are thousands or millions affected that we think twice before pulling the trigger? When do we value the lives of others? Is it only when they don’t cross our paths or do things according to the rules we set?

I do believe that action needed to be taken against him, and in no way am I sad that he is dead; however, I feel that it is wrong for us to celebrate like it is a holiday. We took a life, and maybe I am alone in this, but I am nervous for what is to come.

This is a serious issue with a serious aftermath to follow, and we should not view it so lightly. Bin Laden has to bear his cross and so will we. What he did to our nation will never be forgotten by any American and how we act during this monumental time in history will also be forever noted.

We should not hide our relief or happiness for the moment of peace we have now, but it is only right to refrain from rejoicing over the fact that we murdered him.

Life is the most precious thing a person has, so who are we to put a price on it and decide when it is no longer worth anything. I know I am not alone when I say there were others measures that could have been taken in order to render justice, while serving him what he deserves.

According to Ghandi, an eye for an eye makes the world blind, so let’s not follow down the path of unrighteousness by forgetting what God has taught us. We should forgive others as he has forgiven us.

Shana Ray is a sophomore commnications studies major. She can be reached for comments or questions at [email protected].

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