The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

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The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Swinging sixties flicks in theaters now

Take a trip back in time this weekend with arguably the two best period films of the season. “An Education” and “Pirate Radio” paint brilliant pictures of 1960s Britain: jazz, dress-up and rock ‘n’ roll. Audiences will enjoy both films’ coming-of-age, heart-warming plot lines and masterfully comical characters. However, the perfectly executed nods to 1960s fashion and music are sure to leave audiences captivated.

Already receiving praise as this year’s best from Rolling Stone, The Associated Press, Vanity Fair and The Wall Street Journal, “An Education” hit the Sundance Film Festival this past January and continues to “wow” audiences as it arrives in various theaters this month. The film follows a witty London teenager, Jenny, as she begins to leave her schoolgirl days behind and explore a life she’s always dreamt about. Nick Hornby, screenplay writer and producer, develops a charming character and allows her to grow before audience’s eyes. As Jenny sorts through matters of love, family and education, so does the audience. Driving the film’s captivating uniqueness is Jenny’s exploration of culture in post-war Britain. As Hornby explains in the film’s producer notes, “London was on the verge of swinging, but only a select few could have felt the first sensation of movement.”

Unlike “Pirate Radio,” the soundtrack for “An Education” consists of French songstresses such as the classic Juliette Greco and modern Madeleine Peyroux. According to the film’s Web site, music producer Kle Savidge brought many records to the set of the film.

Savidge and the director’s hopes were that the cast and crew would feel the post-wartime, early 1960s, European vibe. From audience awards and critic reviews, the filmmakers hit their mark. “An Education” oozes European romance, style and elegance. Though their soundtracks differ from jazzy to rock ‘n’ roll, both “An Education” and “Pirate Radio” showcase almost too cool.

Joanna Johnston took on the role of costume designer for “Pirate Radio.” Her years of expertise include films such as “Forest Gump,” “Who Framed Roger Rabbit,” “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” and “About a Boy.” Johnston’s work brought to life this comical adventure with even groovier costumes. Bright paisley patterns, over-the-top ornate military jackets and hippie-approved knit pieces set the scene for a rockin’ good time. “Pirate Radio” plays up 1960s glam. Johnston decked out the guys in slim-fitting suits and pants with pattern mixing that would make Marc Jacobs proud. The ladies in the film could not be more glamorous with big hair, larger-than-life shades and wildly shaped dresses and jackets. Of course, no 1960s glam look could be complete without jet-black “cat eye” eyeliner.

For “An Education,” Odile Dicks-Mireaux designed equally timely and glam costumes. She began her career in costume design at British theaters before joining the British Broadcasting Corp. in the 1970s. With her experience in theater and knowledge of British fashions, Dicks-Mireaux created a fashion story within the film’s plot.

Jenny’s older boyfriend and his colleague dress sharp in slim-tailored suits and accessories such as pocket squares, hats and bow ties. Jenny herself transitions from schoolgirl-plain to Chanel-chic as she becomes mixed with a more mature, worldly crowd. Again, many female characters exude 1960s glam with bold eye make-up and voluptuous up-do’s.

Whether you find time to see one or both, make sure not to miss these 1960s flicks at the Angelika Film Center or at AMC theaters this weekend.

“An Education” and “Pirate Radio” will have you swaying and rocking throughout the entire show. As credits roll, you will be left ready to hurry home, go out and dance all night. In fact, you may find yourself donning your best duds and playing tracks from The Turtles, The Kinks and Ray Charles for weeks to come.

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