The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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‘Duck Season’ hits Dallas next week

What happens when nothing’s happening? That’s what Mexican director Fernando Eimbcke sets as the premise for his film “Duck Season,” opening on Friday at the Inwood Theater.

Best friends Flama and Moko get settled for an afternoon of playing “Halo” and eating junk food while Flama’s parents are away. What seems like a normal day gets interrupted by their neighbor and the pizza delivery guy. Soon the power goes out and the four are forced to spend the day together.

Eimbcke, who also wrote the script, purposely made the film slow-paced and shot in black and white because he wanted to focus on people and relationships. He drew inspiration from films such as Kevin Smith’s “Clerks” for its emphasis on characters.

He said that “the characters that no one pays attention to but are full of life – things that seem unimportant but really aren’t” led him to create the depth in each of his characters, spending three months writing just the bios.

It also gave him the opportunity to engage the viewers and include surprises throughout the film.

According to Eimbcke, for a filmmaker there’s an obligation to surprise the audience, and to “plant something, then start developing it to the viewer, and surprising them” is vital for any movie.

Already released in Mexico and Europe, the film has garnered critical praise, winning prizes at Cannes and 11 Ariel Awards, Mexico’s equivalent to the Oscar. Alfonso Cuaron, director of “Y Tu Mamá Tambien,” was so impressed with the film that he led its distribution into the United States. “Duck Season” follows the recent success of Spanish-language films like “Amores Perros,” “Bad Education” and Cuaron’s film.

“Filmmakers are taking more risks. We don’t have a film industry [in Mexico] but we’ve been well-received overseas.” Eimbcke said.

The film also boasts an impressive soundtrack, featuring top Spanish rock bands like Plastilina Mosh, Molotov and Natalia y La Forquetina.

 

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