The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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iPods get in the way of social interaction

There is a growing problem in today’s society, specifically regarding the younger members. Before I continue, I must say up front that I have absolutely nothing against the iPod, wonderful invention that it is. I love my own iPod (though it appears to be dying on me; it has quite a few years behind it), and I enjoy having the capability to listen to my favorite music while I’m on a plane, in my office or anywhere else where I can’t listen to music out loud.

Other people, however, enjoy using their iPods while walking from one class to another, or while getting food at the cafeteria or while doing pretty much everything. I don’t know if anyone else realizes just how difficult it is to approach someone who has both ears plugged and is clearly listening to music. Keep in mind that these aren’t random strangers, but my own friends that I’m talking about. Even then, it’s still difficult.

iPods have inspired more anti-social behavior in today’s youth. And yes, college students count as youth. With everyone walking around with their earbuds in, not only are people less likely to approach them, but they also give off the impression that they don’t want to be approached. This, of course, leads to an overall decline in human interaction, a void that can only be filled with activities such as texting and Facebooking.

I don’t have anything against Facebook or texting, either. I just think that we, as a culture, could spend less time talking to our “friends” in a chat room and more time in the real world actually talking to those same people face-to-face. Facebook is a perfectly acceptable means of communication for people that you don’t see on a normal basis, but you should not allow it to dominate your life. But I digress from my main topic.

When you use your iPod constantly, you are, in effect, blocking yourself off from the world with music. And I’m going to be honest, when I see someone walk out of a classroom, pull out their iPod, and walk to the building next door for their next class, it pisses me off. You couldn’t just wait until after your classes to listen to some music? Honestly, what’s so good about that song that you have to hear it right now?! You’re not even going to get to hear the whole thing!

To a lesser extent, I also have a problem with all the people at the gym who apparently can’t exercise without something to listen to. I understand how exercising can get boring and I understand that if I complain about too many activities people perform with the iPod, I’ll find that there are no appropriate situations in which to use the iPod. But when I exercise, I like to focus on what I’m doing. Whether I’m lifting weights, running, rock climbing or anything else, I can’t get distracted by something that’s not the task at hand and, most importantly, I don’t want to shut myself out from the world. After all, I am a part of it, so I have an obligation to participate.

In closing, I wish to reiterate that I have nothing against iPods, Facebook and whatever else this rant might encompass. That would be like blaming video games for school violence, which is stupid. All I’m saying is that people need to be more responsible with their music and realize that their favorite songs aren’t going anywhere; it’s okay not to listen to them once in a while.

Trey Treviño is a sophomore CTV major. He can be reached for comment at [email protected].

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