The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

Instagram

Cox advises students on internships, jobs

Just as students are beginning to look for summer internships or upcoming jobs, the Cox School of Business hosted a workshop on career networking. At the event Thursday night, business school students were given tips on networking by professor Dwayne E. Long and then were given a chance to practice the skills they learned.

The workshop was intended to help students learn “how to make the first impression a lasting impression.”

Long, a professor at the Business Leadership Center at the Cox School, began his presentation by defining networking and describing the many benefits.

“It’s all about connecting with people,” he said. “And everything is a result of networking.”

Long then went into detail about ways in which to maximize networking and how to develop an elevator speech. Elevator speeches, which are intended to be short and highlight your strengths, can make a big impression, Long said. They include a brief educational history and the career path you would like to take.

In addition, the differences between networking and interviewing were addressed.

“It’s about gaining information,” Long said. “Don’t ever think it’s about bragging or begging to get a job.”

Long also said that what occurs after a contact or network is developed is equally as important. Always follow up within 48 hours, write a thank you note or an e-mail, and keep a record of all of your contacts. He said although they may not respond, that doesn’t mean they won’t remember you in the future.

Students can also do several things to give themselves an edge compared to others, Long said. Arriving to an event early can provide ample time for networking, as well as staying a few minutes after. Also, memorizing an inventory of your skills and accomplishments is helpful.

“Always ask open-ended questions,” he said. “That way the person says more than yes or no.”

More importantly, all of these things affect the employer’s impression of you, he said.

“You only have once chance to make an impression,” he said. “When students are applying for internships and jobs they realize that networking is real.”

After the presentation, students were given a chance to practice the skills with guest volunteers. Students networked with employees of area companies for approximately five minutes. The employer then gave them constructive feedback on the session.

More to Discover