The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Gridiron girls

 Gridiron girls
Gridiron girls

Gridiron girls

Dallas-area women kicked off their shoes in Ford Stadium duringthe Women’s Football Clinic Thursday night.

The clinic, put together by SMU Football and Mustang Ropers,provided a casual atmosphere for the football coaches to teachwomen about the game. The evening began with dinner, an auction anddoor prizes, included explanations of the offensive and defensivelines and ended with a chance for the ladies to head down to thefield to play.

“We’re gonna go back to the basics,” said headcoach Phil Bennett. He turned over the floor to his assistantcoaches, who gave quick, candid summaries of the positions.

For example, Ronnie Vinklarek, offensive linemen coach,described his players as “the chain gang — no weaklinks” and the guys who “don’t get muchrecognition unless they make a fatal error.”

Larry Edmondson, wide receivers coach, was jokingly referred toas “the ego coach” of the players who “dancearound and look cute.”

When asked if he preferred plays with tight ends or halfbacks,tight end coach Jerry Bennett joked, “It’s like blondesand brunettes.”

The difference between offense and defense can apparently befound in the players’ lockers, said Jim Gush, defensivecoordinator. While a quarterback’s jersey and jock strap arefolded neatly, a defensive lineman’s equipment is thrown inhaphazardly.

More seriously, the coaches praised the team and highlighted afew of this year’s changes, including a”hurry-up,” no-huddle offense. This strategy helps keepthe defense off-balance and lets the offense get in as many playsas possible.

Head coach Bennett also defined several rules and penalties tothe women, such as holding, face mask, pass interference andsideline warning — “That’s when I won’t getoff the field,” he said, recounting an incident at KansasState University when an official ran into him.

The clinic, attended by approximately 35 women this year,started three years ago at Bennett’s suggestion, as he hadheld a similar clinic at KSU.

“It promotes football; it gets [women] interested in theprogram,” he said. Additionally, all the money raised fromthe clinic goes to the Mustang Ropers, a group of SMU students thatsupports the SMU football program and assists with the recruitingof prospective student-athletes.

“It’s fun to be a part of this during the rebuildingyears,” said Elizabeth Bagnati, junior broadcast journalismmajor and third-year Mustang Roper. “It makes theaccomplishments that much more meaningful.”

The coaches also kidded throughout the night that the womencould use their new football knowledge to impress their husbands.Louisa and Judiann Meyer, sisters-in-law, alumnae and season ticketholders, agreed.

“We feel like we learned more tonight than we did anyother night,” they said.

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