The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Students demonstrate talents, diversity at first annual ‘Miss Purple and Gold’ pageant

Her talent highlighted a pair of blue shoes. But instead of singing about blue suede, freshman Udoka Omenukor performed a poem about sneakers. She wrote the poem herself.

“It’s kind of like a poetry slam,” Omenukor said. “You use your voice and body to convey the message.”

Omenukor said she did not have her poem completely memorized before her performance. Additionally, she said she felt nervous because it would be her first time to perform her poetry slam.

During the competition, the poem garnered laughter from the audience, but it did not earn her the title of Omega Psi Phi’s 2008 Miss Purple and Gold. The judges gave that title to junior Sibongile Mlambo.

Both Omenukor and Mlambo participated in the first annual Miss Purple and Gold Pageant on Sunday night in the Hughes-Trigg Theater. The Nu Kappa chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. sponsored the event. The fraternity designed the event for participants to “showcase their talents and be recognized for their diversity,” according to Omega Psi Phi president and pageant emcee Jon Killen.

Omenukor and nine other SMU students competed for $1,500 in scholarships.

Junior Sherri “Shay” Taylor won $250 for the second-runner-up place, and senior Erica Rhodes won $500 for the first-runner-up place. Mlambo recieved $750 and a tiara as the first Miss Purple and Gold.

The pageant process included an application and Sunday rehearsals, according to Omenukor. Contestants competed in five different categories: casual wear, career wear, formal wear, talent and interview. Each contestant wore clothing from her own closet during the pageant.

Omenukor said she likes pageants because “it makes you think about yourself.” She says she is disappointed that she did not win, but that Mlambo deserved the title.

Omenukor said the experience showed her what she wants to do in life. After college, Omenukor hopes to start a consulting firm and an educational program that uses a different theory of teaching.

“I’m really passionate about learning and education,” she said. “I want to create a program for kids.”

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