The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Dallas Symphony Orchestra provides musical journey to Oz

The Dallas Symphony Orchestra spent the weekend in the Land of Oz as it played the entire score to the 1939 film “The Wizard of Oz” while projecting the film on a screen above the orchestra.

For the large number of children in the audience and even many of the adults, the experience of watching the film on the big screen was a first.

Producer John Goberman called the process of removing the music from the film “painstaking.” According to Goberman, the process was done more or less manually.

“I’d like to say there was a button you push… It’s really looking at the sound wave on the monitor and deciding what goes, and what’s not going to affect the voices. Sometimes you clip it by volume, sometimes by frequency, sometimes bit by bit.”

Still, there were several instances in which the orchestra outplayed the voices, making the dialogue difficult to hear.

Two of the munchkins from the original film joined the performance in munchkin-like attire. Eighty-nine-year-old Mickey Carroll, who played town crier during the munchkin scene, joked that he owned underwear older than conductor Richard Kaufman during the introduction before the film.

Carroll and Margaret Pellegrini, who played one of the “sleepy heads” in the birds’ nest, also took a seat in the lobby during intermission to take pictures with the lines of audience members.

While the concept of screening a film to a live orchestra performance may seem pointless, a full house on every night of this weekend’s performance shows that audience members don’t agree when it comes to this classic film.

Future DSO performances include “Copland: Billy The Kid with Westwater Projections,” “The Dallas Symphony presents Julio Iglesias,” “Verdi: Requiem,” “Bruckner: Symphony No. 7” and “A Lemony Snicket Mystery.” Some performances offer reduced ticket prices to students through the Student Rush program.

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