The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Pulling the plug on textbooks

E-reader pilot programs are popping up all over the country, bringing a new way of reading to K-12th graders, who are cracking the spine on alternative reading tools.

The Grand Prairie Independent School District is testing out Barnes and Noble’s Nook Books in the classroom. Combining technology with reading, Grand Prairie hopes to boost literacy using 21st century technology. Three middle schools in the area are part of this program.

“We each have 30 Nooks at each campus and 10 are available for checkout. The other 20 are available for use on campus,” Lisa Howell, the instructional media specialist at James Fannin Middle School, said.

Because Nooks are still geared to the consumer markets, the costs are pricy, but many believe the educational payoff will be worth it.

“We have 30 [Nooks] worth $200 and then we have carrying cases,” Howell said. “Then we had to buy the e-books on top of that. So, it was definitely a financial venture, but one that we believe will prove to be extremely beneficial to our students.”

Teachers say the arrival of e-readers is creating an excitement for the age-old pastime – changing how students feel about reading one Nook at a time.

“It was amazing,” Howell said. “The students have been so excited. We have a waiting list of over 50 students at this time.”

The e-reader pilot program is expected to last though the end of the year.

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