The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

Instagram

Rock music to plug your ears to

Rock ‘n’ roll used to be dangerous. The statement sounds almost absurd as soon as it leaves the lips. But still there was a time when Elvis’ hips and John Lennon’s activism seemed like greater threats to national security than the population of C Block at Guantanamo Bay.

Sure, the excitement is still there. But let’s be honest: Things have changed. If parents are still going to freak over little Johnny listening to The Jonas Brothers, they probably have bigger problems than little Johnny listening to The Jonas Brothers. But while rock music by and large has made a move toward more theatrical and arguably “safe” aesthetics, some still bravely practice the past. Here are four records from 2007 that prove just that.

Coliseum, “No Salvation”

Remember when Anthrax was more than just a substance that could kill you? Probably not, but don’t worry, neither do Coliseum. But while “No Salvation” may tremble and bleed with the kind of 100 MPH attack of speed metal perfected by bands like Anthrax and Metallica in the ’80s, these boys clearly took some notes and then promptly started re-writing the book. Tunes like the punishing “Seven Cities” carry on the speed metal torch but hold high their influences of metal-core heroes like Converge. But what really gets the jaw dropping and ears pounding are cuts like the epic “Profetas,” which employs both the urgency and ire of The Refused while crafting a metal riff so sharp it’d scare Black Sabbath.

Pissed Jeans, “Hope for Men”

If music were manners, Pissed Jeans possesses all the class of a schizophrenic off his meds. Screeching, writhing guitars slam face first into walls of static and apocalyptic bass distortion. Buzz saw crafted riffs shred gruffly through droning, drugged-out madness (“Scrapbooking”). It wouldn’t be naive to assume “Hope for Men” doesn’t contain much at all. But when you jam this much punk, hardcore and noise into one small package, that’s to be expected. Singer Matt Korvette barbarically channels everyone from Iggy Pop to David Yow of The Jesus Lizard on tracks like the primal attack of “I’m Turning Now.”

Pygmy Lush, “Bitter River”

There isn’t much glamour to being in a “screamo” band. For one thing, there’s the misunderstanding as to exactly what that means. Those with a shallower scope will point to bands like Fall Out Boy. Those who believe music began with Rites of Spring and ended with Saetia obsessively search eBay for one of the 666 copies of “Document #5.” And while those belonging to the second group may confuse anyone who hasn’t heard cult favorites Pg. 99, the now defunct band’s newest assembly of three previous members with a few friends will no doubt confuse everyone. “Bitter River,” the band’s debut record, is loud and mad as all hell. Well, sort of. Almost split down the middle, half of the record slams with the raw ferocity of Nirvana’s “Bleach” (“Slave To A Teenager”), while other tracks resemble Tom Waits flipping through his folk records (“Hurt Everything”).

The Black Lips,

“Good Bad Not Evil”

Atlanta’s two best-known exports may be rappers and The Braves, but with the release of “Good Bad Not Evil,” that shouldn’t be true much longer. Together for almost a decade, The Black Lips have been shouting over their self-described “flower punk” for four albums now. But “Evil” is a different demon entirely. Delta blues collides with punk, crusty classic rock ‘n’ roll riffs deconstruct themselves to reveal impressive pop sensibilities. Tracks like the irreverent love song to a natural disaster “Katrina” find The Lips wandering recklessly over their spring-loaded, jangly guitar tone and lo-fi production like psychedelic punks on a vision quest.

More to Discover