The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Young Frankenstein brings frightening fun to life

Lauren Smart

If you’re looking for a good dose of fun to kick off the new year, the Mel Brooks’ musical “Young Frankenstein” is alive at the Winspear Opera House and delivers the most laughs seen in that space since “Avenue Q” last summer.

This 2007 Broadway show is the song and dance conception of the 1974 film of the same name that may have been riding on the coattails of the success Brooks’ had with the transference of “The Producers” into a stage show back in 2001.

The musical follows the grandson of the infamous Dr. Frankenstein as he travels to Transylvania to view his recently deceased grandfather’s castle, only to find himself taking over the family business.

The tour features a vocally strong cast with Christopher Ryan singing the role of Frederick Frankenstein (that’s pronounced Fronkensteen), Synthia Link in the role of his voluptuous laboratory assistant, Inga, and Joanna Glushak as the spooky Frau Blucher.

Janine Divita may have the largest shoes to fill, as she has taken on the role of Elizabeth that Megan Mullally (Will and Grace) made famous, but Divita manages to add her own spice to her character’s songs, which include “Please Don’t Touch Me” and “Deep Love.”

Despite the talent throughout the cast, the loveable, deformed servant Igor (that’s Eye-Gor to you) steals the show thanks to Cory English’s impeccable comic timing.

In the styling of Mel Brooks, this musical is one laugh line after another and even though a few might fall flat, the audience remains in stitches throughout most of the performance.

If the obvious climax (double entendre!) of the show might be the monster coming to life – think again. Everything comes down to the big dance number, a la Susan Stroman the original director and choreographer of the show, “Putting on the Ritz,” which is sung just like the version in the movie, but with more pizzazz and a chorus of tap dancing monsters.

Although this installment of the Lexus Broadway Series is far from perfect, there is fun for anyone with a slightly dirty sense of humor (I’d rate it generously at PG-13) and an appreciation for the theater of song and dance.

Don’t miss this stop of the national tour, at the Winspear through Jan. 23. For more information visit, attpac.org.

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