The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

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Of Montreal steals the stage

The lights dimmed on a packed house at The Grenada while remnants of Janelle Monae’s R&B soul atmosphere lingered in the crowd. Strange images illuminated the stage’s surrounding screens as each band member casually made their way to their instruments, each dressed flamboyantly and emphasizing the enigmatic mood.

A hard bass backbeat and foreboding synthesizer lead Kevin Barnes of Of Montreal onto the stage. Purple tights, apron, and all, Barnes kicked off the night and fed the begging audience with “Coquet Coquette,” a hit from their new 2010 album, False Priest.

The band began their False Priest tour in July of 2010, just a few months before the album released in September. The album, similar to others, is saturated in disco influenced dance beats and sensual lyrics that fit the persona of the band members seemingly flawlessly and make for a great show.

Barnes danced through the night and performed songs, both old and new, while the audience gyrated and sang along. This, however, was very unlike any other concert in that sprinkled throughout a majority of the songs, Of Montreal decided that their presence alone was not good enough for their fans — what better way to entertain then to bring a series of skeleton children, Chinese dragons, life-size pigs, and silver people into the act. And as if the characters and their costumes weren’t enough, these characters then proceeded to play out intricate scenes.

These scenes, though extremely scandalous, fit snuggly into the set list the band had put together and successfully enhanced the fan’s experience by adding to the shock factor previously created by the band member’s chosen attire. From pig bestiality, to cannibalism, to nuanced statements concerning young America, Of Montreal and their stage circus comically covered an overwhelming range of issues – all controversial, of course.

With music, dancing, some narrative driven scenes and costume changes, it’s hard to believe that the experience was a concert and not a musical.

For roughly a two-hour period of time Tuesday night, dull moments did not exist within the walls of The Grenada: only clean fun had by a vast array of people varying in both age and kind.

It was an remarkable was to end such a dreary day and in the words of Kevin Barnes, “All good stories end with a gong.”

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