The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

The Independent Voice of Southern Methodist University Since 1915

The Daily Campus

Instagram

The Daily Campus Elections

Republicans: Taking back USA

The November mid-term elections are shaping up to be an historically sharp rebuke of both the Democratic-controlled Congress and the Obama administration.

While many elections hinge on rhetoric and political theatrics, this particular election will refreshingly focus on substantive policy disagreements between the American people and elected Democrats.  

During the race for President in 2008, Barack Obama campaigned on the ambiguous, amorphous idea of “change”.  Two years into his administration, the American people have learned exactly what “change” means.  Democratic control of the legislative and executive branches has permitted them to radically change the American health care system, financial markets and foreign policy.

Resoundingly, the American people have rejected this unprecedented intrusion of government into the lives of private citizens.  According to the most recent data from RealClearPolitics, in a generic congressional race, Republicans lead Democrats by 6.4 percent.  Rasmussen places that number at 12 percent.  The wave of discontent in this country will likely sweep Republicans back into a majority in the House and possibly the Senate.

Amongst the numerous pundits on television and in print, a great deal of attention has been paid to the lack of a cohesive Republican “message”.  I would argue that more than ever, these polls demonstrate that the Republican message is connecting with people across the political spectrum.  Never before have the principles of balanced budgets, limited government, tax policy that promotes and stimulates private enterprise and innovation, and robust foreign policy held more appeal.  Democrats in Washington, through both their policy initiatives and rhetoric, have damaged the tentative economic recovery currently underway.  Intrusion into the health care system and the passage of onerous, unclear financial regulations have caused foreign nations to question whether America is still a place hospitable to business.  Democrats seem unable to understand the financial anxieties of the typical American.

This election ultimately boils down to one thing: in the words of James Carville, “It’s the economy, stupid”.

One of the races that best exemplifies the dynamics of this election cycle is the Texas race for governor. It merits special attention because of its relevance to SMU students.  When members of the SMU community head to the polls in November, this will be the race at the top of the ballot.  At stake is the continued prosperity of the state of Texas.  In 10 years as governor, Rick Perry has established a clear track record of promoting the expansion of Texas business, strengthening the Texas economy, protecting the Texas border, lowering taxes, and keeping Texas competitive in a global marketplace.

In an election that will focus more on substance and less on style, the governor’s record speaks for itself. While unemployment has ravaged states from California to Michigan, the Texas economy has remained relatively robust with unemployment remaining at 8.2 percent compared to the national average of 9.6 percent.  The challenger, Bill White, has yet to present a compelling case for Texans to replace the current governor. Voters seem un-convinced, as the most recent Rasmussen poll has Perry at 49 percent and White at 41 percent. Voters in Texas have seen the benefits of limited government that performs a few functions well and places the power to grow the economy in the hands of the people.     

At times, watching elected officials on TV and the pundits that dissect their actions can cause us as college students to feel marginalized, if not powerless.  It can seem impossible to decipher what’s real from what’s rhetoric. What you need to realize is that this country and its future belong to you as much as anyone else. As a college student and young adult, it’s time that you take ownership of your country and seize control of its direction. When November rolls around, it is not only your duty to vote, it is in your best interest. Vote for an America that recognizes its greatest asset is the boundless innovation of its people.  Vote for an America with financial regulations and a tax code that stimulate and encourage the sort of innovation necessary for America to continue to enjoy the unmatched prosperity it has enjoyed for so long. Vote for an America with a foreign policy that values security and recognizes that liberty must be defended vigorously at any cost. Vote for an America that empowers you to go as far as your hard work, intelligence and ambition can take you. Vote Republican.

Chad Cohen is a junior majoring in finance, with an English minor. He is also the President of College Republicans. Cohen can be reached for questions or comments at [email protected]. College Republicans meets every Wednesday at 5:30 p..m. in The Varsity.

More to Discover